modern thrifter

modern thrifter

Thrifter & designer. Blogging about life in our MCM home & living on a budget. I also design things with my husband. You can see our work at The Mahoney Studio

[ Seppo Mallat & An Everlasting Meal ]
As a kid, I used to spend afternoons in my grandma’s kitchen learning how to make pies and bread, and how to cook and can chokecherry jelly. As an adult, I don’t love cooking everyday. There are evenings where it feels like just another chore and the meal is met with “do I really have to eat that?” looks on the kids’ faces. 
More often than not, though, I find a simple pleasure in food—both preparing and eating it. It’s even more enjoyable when I use tools for which I have a fondness, like my vintage Le Creuset sauce pan, my thrifted rolling pin, identical to the one my mom has used since my childhood, and now, my newly thrifted Seppo Mallat Finel sauté pan. 
I have always hoped to find Kobenstyle cookware at the thrift store, but have struck out thus far. I hadn’t ever seen the Finel cookware designed by Seppo Mallat until I snagged this pan off the shelf at Goodwill. Now, I am head over heels for the design. I like the modern straight sides of the designs in contrast to the more traditional shape of Kobenstyle. 
While my new pan makes me smile every time I use it, the book I’m currently reading, An Everlasting Meal, has me inspired and excited to cook up something new. Author Tamar Adler writes eloquently about the endless possibilities of the simplest foods. I found myself chuckling as she describes the elation of peeling a boiled egg in one swoop, and my mouth watering, craving a slice of garlicky toast at midnight when I’m reading in bed.
I have the book for another week from the library before I sadly have to return it. I think I will have to put this on my wish list, as I think it is an excellent resource to own.  
Here is an excerpt from Chapter 1: How to boil water

“There is a prevailing theory that we need to know much more than we do in order to feed ourselves well. It isn’t true. Most of us already have water, a pot to put it in, and a way to light a fire. This gives us boiling water, in which we can do more good cooking than we seem to realize.
Our culture frowns on cooking in water. A pot and water are both simple and homely. It is hard to improve on the technology of the pot, or of the boil, leaving, when it comes to this particular technique, nothing for the cookbook and cookware industries to sell.
The pot was invented 10,000 years ago, and a simmering one has been a symbol of a well-tended hearth every since. I don’t mean to suggest that now that you have been reminded of the age and goodness of a pot of water, you start boiling everything in your kitchen, but that instead of trying to figure out what to do about dinner, you put a big pot of water on the stove, light the burner under it, and then, as soon as it’s on its way to getting hot, start looking for things to put in it. Once you do, you will have dropped yourself, in a single gesture, directly into the middle of cooking a meal, jostled by your faith and will a few steps closer to dinner…”

[ Seppo Mallat & An Everlasting Meal ]

As a kid, I used to spend afternoons in my grandma’s kitchen learning how to make pies and bread, and how to cook and can chokecherry jelly. As an adult, I don’t love cooking everyday. There are evenings where it feels like just another chore and the meal is met with “do I really have to eat that?” looks on the kids’ faces. 

More often than not, though, I find a simple pleasure in food—both preparing and eating it. It’s even more enjoyable when I use tools for which I have a fondness, like my vintage Le Creuset sauce pan, my thrifted rolling pin, identical to the one my mom has used since my childhood, and now, my newly thrifted Seppo Mallat Finel sauté pan. 

I have always hoped to find Kobenstyle cookware at the thrift store, but have struck out thus far. I hadn’t ever seen the Finel cookware designed by Seppo Mallat until I snagged this pan off the shelf at Goodwill. Now, I am head over heels for the design. I like the modern straight sides of the designs in contrast to the more traditional shape of Kobenstyle. 

While my new pan makes me smile every time I use it, the book I’m currently reading, An Everlasting Meal, has me inspired and excited to cook up something new. Author Tamar Adler writes eloquently about the endless possibilities of the simplest foods. I found myself chuckling as she describes the elation of peeling a boiled egg in one swoop, and my mouth watering, craving a slice of garlicky toast at midnight when I’m reading in bed.

I have the book for another week from the library before I sadly have to return it. I think I will have to put this on my wish list, as I think it is an excellent resource to own.  

Here is an excerpt from Chapter 1: How to boil water

“There is a prevailing theory that we need to know much more than we do in order to feed ourselves well. It isn’t true. Most of us already have water, a pot to put it in, and a way to light a fire. This gives us boiling water, in which we can do more good cooking than we seem to realize.

Our culture frowns on cooking in water. A pot and water are both simple and homely. It is hard to improve on the technology of the pot, or of the boil, leaving, when it comes to this particular technique, nothing for the cookbook and cookware industries to sell.

The pot was invented 10,000 years ago, and a simmering one has been a symbol of a well-tended hearth every since. I don’t mean to suggest that now that you have been reminded of the age and goodness of a pot of water, you start boiling everything in your kitchen, but that instead of trying to figure out what to do about dinner, you put a big pot of water on the stove, light the burner under it, and then, as soon as it’s on its way to getting hot, start looking for things to put in it. Once you do, you will have dropped yourself, in a single gesture, directly into the middle of cooking a meal, jostled by your faith and will a few steps closer to dinner…”

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[ HAUL OUT THE HOLLY ]
I’ve been not-so-patiently waiting all week to pull out all the Christmas decorations. We always cut our own real tree, and typically we get it Thanksgiving weekend. Since there is an extra week between Thanksgiving and Christmas this year, we decided to hold off until this weekend to avoid a dead tree by the big day. Tomorrow is the day, and we’re all pretty excited around here to deck the halls.
I thrifted this sweet little santa this morning for a whopping 30¢.  He was made in East Germany, or “Germany East” as it says on the bottom, and the condition is amazing. He’ll be a welcome addition to our decorations.

[ HAUL OUT THE HOLLY ]

I’ve been not-so-patiently waiting all week to pull out all the Christmas decorations. We always cut our own real tree, and typically we get it Thanksgiving weekend. Since there is an extra week between Thanksgiving and Christmas this year, we decided to hold off until this weekend to avoid a dead tree by the big day. Tomorrow is the day, and we’re all pretty excited around here to deck the halls.

I thrifted this sweet little santa this morning for a whopping 30¢.  He was made in East Germany, or “Germany East” as it says on the bottom, and the condition is amazing. He’ll be a welcome addition to our decorations.

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[ MODERN CHESS ]
While back in Montana visiting my mother, I ran across my dad’s old chess set. I asked my mom a few questions about it and she told me that it was a Christmas gift she gave my dad in the early 70s. She paid $75 for the pieces, and after realizing that they were much too beautiful to be played on a cheap black and red board, she went back and bought the wood board for $25.

I always loved this set, and I remember being surprised as a kid when I first saw a standard set, because the pieces looked so literal to their names. I hadn’t realized that the set on which I had learned the game was so unusual.
Since my mom doesn’t play chess anymore, and I have lots of fond memories of playing chess with both my dad and my sister, my mom said I should take it home with me. Though there were no identifying marks on the set, it only took a twenty second google search to uncover that it is a Universum chess set designed by Arthur Elliott for Anri (Italy). I had no idea that it would be worth so much, but it seems that the set sells for upwards of $700. It is worth more than that to me, so I have no plans to ever sell it. I can’t wait to teach Alden and Tula how to play chess on their Grandpa’s board.

[ MODERN CHESS ]

While back in Montana visiting my mother, I ran across my dad’s old chess set. I asked my mom a few questions about it and she told me that it was a Christmas gift she gave my dad in the early 70s. She paid $75 for the pieces, and after realizing that they were much too beautiful to be played on a cheap black and red board, she went back and bought the wood board for $25.

image

I always loved this set, and I remember being surprised as a kid when I first saw a standard set, because the pieces looked so literal to their names. I hadn’t realized that the set on which I had learned the game was so unusual.

Since my mom doesn’t play chess anymore, and I have lots of fond memories of playing chess with both my dad and my sister, my mom said I should take it home with me. Though there were no identifying marks on the set, it only took a twenty second google search to uncover that it is a Universum chess set designed by Arthur Elliott for Anri (Italy). I had no idea that it would be worth so much, but it seems that the set sells for upwards of $700. It is worth more than that to me, so I have no plans to ever sell it. I can’t wait to teach Alden and Tula how to play chess on their Grandpa’s board.

image

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[ CHURCH RUMMAGE SALE ]
We hit a church rummage sale the week before we went on vacation, and I’m just now getting around to sharing all of the goodies I brought home. At first glance, the sale was unimpressive, but after making a few rounds past the tables, we found some great things. The first thing that I grabbed was a Dansk Spider candleholder. I’ve been digging through the metal/candleholder shelves at every thrift store I go to for at least the past year or two trying to find one of these. When I saw it sitting on the table, I almost jumped out of surprise. Even better, I only paid 75¢ for it.
The book behind the candleholder wasn’t from the sale, I just wanted to put it in the picture so I would remember to mention it on the blog. It was actually a birthday gift from my in-laws. The book is a tribute to the work of A. Quincy Jones (known for many residential and commercial buildings in California, including the later Eichler Homes). It is chock full of beautiful vintage photographs, floor plans, and renderings.

Finding one vintage Dansk piece at the church sale was surprising enough, but then I saw a set of six Dansk Bouquette vases still in the original box. I haven’t decided if I’m keeping these yet or not. I’ve seen them before in turquoise, which I think would fit my style more, but the price was cheap enough that I decided to bring them home anyway. I’ve been thinking of adding a Big Cartel store onto my blog, with five or six vintage items for sale at a time, but we’ll see. 

Don’t you love these miniature wood dishes? I collected mini tea sets when I was a little girl, so they still have a special place in my heart. I’ve been looking all over online to find out where these might be from, but I’ve come up empty-handed. There are a few lids missing and a couple of handles that need gluing, but still in overall nice condition. I should have included something in the picture for scale, but to give you the general idea, the tallest pieces are just under two inches. 

I also found a couple of vintage wall textiles:


The top one is by Swedish artist Ulla Scheuer. I wish I had a little more information about her, but from what I can gather from one obscure Swedish blog is that she was a freelance textile designer, married to an interior designer. She created designs for napkins, wall hangings, tablecloths, and other home decor until her divorce, when she was forced to quit illustrating and work various jobs as a cook, maid, and a nanny. I think the birds are so sweet in Tula’s room, and they are her favorite colors, pink and purple.  
the second wall hanging is a vintage Marushka print. I’m sure just about everyone will remember seeing one of these hanging in a doctors office or friend’s house when they were a kid. They are more commonly images of sailboats or lighthouses, color-blocked in the orange and brown that typifies the 1970s. I’m not a big fan of the ones that look quintessentially 70s, but this sandpiper print is a little more understated and timeless. You can learn more about the history of Marushka here.

The loot doesn’t end there. I picked up an unmarked wood taper candle holder and a wood bottle opener that is marked with a “Handcrafted Holline Denmark” sticker, for 25¢ each.

Lastly, we found this mid-century fireplace toolset. Based on the other sets I found online, I think this is made by Seymour Mfg. Company. The metal is a little spotted and rusty, so we waited until the sale was 50% off, and went back to pick it up. I like the shapes of the handles, but I’m not tied to keeping this in its original state. I’m toying with the idea of painting the handles a fun color, or at least painting the brass accents. 
We came out with some screaming deals that day, and all total we spent under $20 for everything (including a few little toys for the kids). Oh, how I do love a good church sale.

[ CHURCH RUMMAGE SALE ]

We hit a church rummage sale the week before we went on vacation, and I’m just now getting around to sharing all of the goodies I brought home. At first glance, the sale was unimpressive, but after making a few rounds past the tables, we found some great things. The first thing that I grabbed was a Dansk Spider candleholder. I’ve been digging through the metal/candleholder shelves at every thrift store I go to for at least the past year or two trying to find one of these. When I saw it sitting on the table, I almost jumped out of surprise. Even better, I only paid 75¢ for it.

The book behind the candleholder wasn’t from the sale, I just wanted to put it in the picture so I would remember to mention it on the blog. It was actually a birthday gift from my in-laws. The book is a tribute to the work of A. Quincy Jones (known for many residential and commercial buildings in California, including the later Eichler Homes). It is chock full of beautiful vintage photographs, floor plans, and renderings.

Finding one vintage Dansk piece at the church sale was surprising enough, but then I saw a set of six Dansk Bouquette vases still in the original box. I haven’t decided if I’m keeping these yet or not. I’ve seen them before in turquoise, which I think would fit my style more, but the price was cheap enough that I decided to bring them home anyway. I’ve been thinking of adding a Big Cartel store onto my blog, with five or six vintage items for sale at a time, but we’ll see. 

Don’t you love these miniature wood dishes? I collected mini tea sets when I was a little girl, so they still have a special place in my heart. I’ve been looking all over online to find out where these might be from, but I’ve come up empty-handed. There are a few lids missing and a couple of handles that need gluing, but still in overall nice condition. I should have included something in the picture for scale, but to give you the general idea, the tallest pieces are just under two inches. 

I also found a couple of vintage wall textiles:

The top one is by Swedish artist Ulla Scheuer. I wish I had a little more information about her, but from what I can gather from one obscure Swedish blog is that she was a freelance textile designer, married to an interior designer. She created designs for napkins, wall hangings, tablecloths, and other home decor until her divorce, when she was forced to quit illustrating and work various jobs as a cook, maid, and a nanny. I think the birds are so sweet in Tula’s room, and they are her favorite colors, pink and purple.  

the second wall hanging is a vintage Marushka print. I’m sure just about everyone will remember seeing one of these hanging in a doctors office or friend’s house when they were a kid. They are more commonly images of sailboats or lighthouses, color-blocked in the orange and brown that typifies the 1970s. I’m not a big fan of the ones that look quintessentially 70s, but this sandpiper print is a little more understated and timeless. You can learn more about the history of Marushka here.

The loot doesn’t end there. I picked up an unmarked wood taper candle holder and a wood bottle opener that is marked with a “Handcrafted Holline Denmark” sticker, for 25¢ each.

Lastly, we found this mid-century fireplace toolset. Based on the other sets I found online, I think this is made by Seymour Mfg. Company. The metal is a little spotted and rusty, so we waited until the sale was 50% off, and went back to pick it up. I like the shapes of the handles, but I’m not tied to keeping this in its original state. I’m toying with the idea of painting the handles a fun color, or at least painting the brass accents. 

We came out with some screaming deals that day, and all total we spent under $20 for everything (including a few little toys for the kids). Oh, how I do love a good church sale.

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[ BALANCING NEW WITH VINTAGE ]
By now, I think just about everyone knows that I love clocks. My father-in-law is certainly aware of this little fact, and has actually given me two clocks in the last month! The first one is a Navy shift clock which I’ll post more about when we get it hung on the wall. For Christmas, he found this vintage brass starburst clock for me. Though he won’t reveal his source, I’m guessing it’s an Ebay find—he’s sort of the Ebay ninja of the family.
We tested the clock in several spots, but there seems to be a delicate balance in our house between vintage pieces and newer modern items. Though some people like having a home that is all from the same era, we prefer to tie the old with the new, and hanging the clock in the living room seemed to tip the scale too far in favor of vintage. Instead, we found a nice little spot in our bedroom, which is currently decorated with mostly current modern furnishings (we have a Malm bed, CB2 Whirly hanging balls, and Amy Butler fabric on the chair to name a few).
I’m thinking of buying a new movement mechanism in order to convert this to a battery powered clock, but I’ve never done that before. I’m hoping it’s not too complicated.

[ BALANCING NEW WITH VINTAGE ]

By now, I think just about everyone knows that I love clocks. My father-in-law is certainly aware of this little fact, and has actually given me two clocks in the last month! The first one is a Navy shift clock which I’ll post more about when we get it hung on the wall. For Christmas, he found this vintage brass starburst clock for me. Though he won’t reveal his source, I’m guessing it’s an Ebay find—he’s sort of the Ebay ninja of the family.

We tested the clock in several spots, but there seems to be a delicate balance in our house between vintage pieces and newer modern items. Though some people like having a home that is all from the same era, we prefer to tie the old with the new, and hanging the clock in the living room seemed to tip the scale too far in favor of vintage. Instead, we found a nice little spot in our bedroom, which is currently decorated with mostly current modern furnishings (we have a Malm bed, CB2 Whirly hanging balls, and Amy Butler fabric on the chair to name a few).

I’m thinking of buying a new movement mechanism in order to convert this to a battery powered clock, but I’ve never done that before. I’m hoping it’s not too complicated.

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[ CHILDHOOD TREASURES ]
When I was a little girl growing up in rural Montana, my family would frequently drive an hour and a half north of our town to an even more rural part of Montana, near the canadian border, to visit my Grandmother. She lived in a farmhouse on the edge of a town with a whopping population of 68 people. It was the same house where she raised my dad and his two siblings, and it was filled with old treasures—my dad’s old die-cast tractors, a wind-up cowboy rider, an old board game that was some sort of fox and hound chase, and many more fantastic toys.

Of all the toys at the house, nothing stands out in my mind as much as the wooden castle blocks do. My sister and I would play with them for hours, lost in our imagination. My grandmother has long since passed away, and I figured that the blocks were gone as well, so imagine my surprise when my Aunt pulled them out of a closet last week at her home in California. She said she had originally purchased them in Germany (though judging by the writing on the box, they are maybe French) when she was teaching elementary school in Europe during the late 1950s. She brought them back with her and kept them at my Grandmother’s house.


My Aunt is one of the most generous people I know—always serving, always giving, always loving other people. She insisted that the blocks be taken home by either my sister or myself. Since my sister’s suitcase was nearly bursting its zipper, and because she, too, is incredibly generous, I was the lucky recipient of these treasured blocks. What a joy it was to see the looks on Alden and Tula’s faces when I pulled these from my bag and opened the box.

[ CHILDHOOD TREASURES ]

When I was a little girl growing up in rural Montana, my family would frequently drive an hour and a half north of our town to an even more rural part of Montana, near the canadian border, to visit my Grandmother. She lived in a farmhouse on the edge of a town with a whopping population of 68 people. It was the same house where she raised my dad and his two siblings, and it was filled with old treasures—my dad’s old die-cast tractors, a wind-up cowboy rider, an old board game that was some sort of fox and hound chase, and many more fantastic toys.

Of all the toys at the house, nothing stands out in my mind as much as the wooden castle blocks do. My sister and I would play with them for hours, lost in our imagination. My grandmother has long since passed away, and I figured that the blocks were gone as well, so imagine my surprise when my Aunt pulled them out of a closet last week at her home in California. She said she had originally purchased them in Germany (though judging by the writing on the box, they are maybe French) when she was teaching elementary school in Europe during the late 1950s. She brought them back with her and kept them at my Grandmother’s house.

My Aunt is one of the most generous people I know—always serving, always giving, always loving other people. She insisted that the blocks be taken home by either my sister or myself. Since my sister’s suitcase was nearly bursting its zipper, and because she, too, is incredibly generous, I was the lucky recipient of these treasured blocks. What a joy it was to see the looks on Alden and Tula’s faces when I pulled these from my bag and opened the box.

Comments
[ FAVORITE FINDS: VINTAGE TURNTABLE ]
It seems like the thrift stores have been pretty underwhelming the last few months, though I was able to get a good haul of kids clothes last week from Deseret Industries. I had given up on finding any good household deals for the week, but while we were out on Saturday, we spotted an estate sale. On a whim, we decided to stop so that I could run in (while Patrick stayed in the car with the hungry and bored kids).
I knew my time was limited, so I did a quick scan—nothing too interesting, but this beautiful wood turntable caught my eye. There was a post-it note with $15 hand-written, slapped on it. I thought maybe the price was just for the turntable, but there were speakers, a radio component, and an 8-track player sitting next to it, so I asked the seller. It was all included, all still hooked up, and all still working.
We brought it home, though we haven’t been able to come up with a great spot to set it up. I was hoping it would fit in the low bench/shelf that we have under the living room window—it would have looked great—but it’s about 3/8” too wide. It’s always the little things like this that initiate a giant rearrange project, so we’ll see where it leads. I’ll share pictures of it, in its entirety, when we finally come up with something that works; I can’t seem to stop taking pictures of its vintage coolness. Doesn’t it photograph wonderfully?
I haven’t done a ton of online research on this system yet, though I did see the same model of turntable (without any of the other components, and in worse condition) that sold for $65. Our lovely new getup is in near-perfect condition and sounds beautiful—just in time to play some old Bing Crosby albums while sipping hot buttered rum and trimming the tree.

[ FAVORITE FINDS: VINTAGE TURNTABLE ]

It seems like the thrift stores have been pretty underwhelming the last few months, though I was able to get a good haul of kids clothes last week from Deseret Industries. I had given up on finding any good household deals for the week, but while we were out on Saturday, we spotted an estate sale. On a whim, we decided to stop so that I could run in (while Patrick stayed in the car with the hungry and bored kids).

I knew my time was limited, so I did a quick scan—nothing too interesting, but this beautiful wood turntable caught my eye. There was a post-it note with $15 hand-written, slapped on it. I thought maybe the price was just for the turntable, but there were speakers, a radio component, and an 8-track player sitting next to it, so I asked the seller. It was all included, all still hooked up, and all still working.

We brought it home, though we haven’t been able to come up with a great spot to set it up. I was hoping it would fit in the low bench/shelf that we have under the living room window—it would have looked great—but it’s about 3/8” too wide. It’s always the little things like this that initiate a giant rearrange project, so we’ll see where it leads. I’ll share pictures of it, in its entirety, when we finally come up with something that works; I can’t seem to stop taking pictures of its vintage coolness. Doesn’t it photograph wonderfully?

I haven’t done a ton of online research on this system yet, though I did see the same model of turntable (without any of the other components, and in worse condition) that sold for $65. Our lovely new getup is in near-perfect condition and sounds beautiful—just in time to play some old Bing Crosby albums while sipping hot buttered rum and trimming the tree.

Comments
[ FINISHED CANISTER PROJECT ]
Although I ambitiously set out to tackle several projects over the summer, most of them never even got started. I did, however, manage to do a little update on these vintage kitchen canisters that I bought at Deseret Industries last spring for $2 a piece. I guess I shouldn’t take all the credit for this project. I did most of the prep work, but Patrick actually sprayed most of the coats of paint (two coats of primer, two coats of color, and two coats of lacquer). I’m so glad that I was able to find the exact color of red-orange that I was imagining, and I think it looks much better than the yellow I almost settled for.
Here are a few pictures of the process:

The first photo is apparently the only “before” photo I took. I hate when that happens. I used frog tape and an exacto knife to mask off the labels. We also masked the bottom and the inside, which was a total pain.
Next we primed and sanded with a very fine sandpaper. Oh, and that’s Patrick’s hand, not mine :)
The third photo is of our mistake. Usually when using spray paint, spraying thin layers from ten to twelve inches away yields the best results. We learned the hard way that this particular paint (Montana brand) dries so fast it was leaving a thick texture on the surface because it was drying mid-air, so we had to spray at closer range.
Alden even got to do a little painting.
The specialty paint was more expensive than the standard spray paint at home depot—$8 per can as opposed to $4 per can, and we needed two cans—but we were able to get a few extra projects painted with the leftovers. Remember that vintage desk lamp that we picked up for $3 this summer? It’s now been rewired and repainted. Here’s what it looks like now:

[ FINISHED CANISTER PROJECT ]

Although I ambitiously set out to tackle several projects over the summer, most of them never even got started. I did, however, manage to do a little update on these vintage kitchen canisters that I bought at Deseret Industries last spring for $2 a piece. I guess I shouldn’t take all the credit for this project. I did most of the prep work, but Patrick actually sprayed most of the coats of paint (two coats of primer, two coats of color, and two coats of lacquer). I’m so glad that I was able to find the exact color of red-orange that I was imagining, and I think it looks much better than the yellow I almost settled for.

Here are a few pictures of the process:

The first photo is apparently the only “before” photo I took. I hate when that happens. I used frog tape and an exacto knife to mask off the labels. We also masked the bottom and the inside, which was a total pain.

Next we primed and sanded with a very fine sandpaper. Oh, and that’s Patrick’s hand, not mine :)

The third photo is of our mistake. Usually when using spray paint, spraying thin layers from ten to twelve inches away yields the best results. We learned the hard way that this particular paint (Montana brand) dries so fast it was leaving a thick texture on the surface because it was drying mid-air, so we had to spray at closer range.

Alden even got to do a little painting.

The specialty paint was more expensive than the standard spray paint at home depot—$8 per can as opposed to $4 per can, and we needed two cans—but we were able to get a few extra projects painted with the leftovers. Remember that vintage desk lamp that we picked up for $3 this summer? It’s now been rewired and repainted. Here’s what it looks like now:

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[ FRIDAY FIND: DIALING FOR DOLLARS ]
I’ve been keeping my eyes open for one of these phones for a while, this one is a vintage Stromberg Carlson 1543w, to go along with our vintage Royal typewriter. Our kids play “office” all the time, and I knew they’d love to have a phone to add to their setup. This thing is super heavy—the weight of the receiver in my hand makes modern technology seem cheap. Though most of the phone is in really nice condition, the dial is not working properly. It will spin if you give it some muscle, but it doesn’t have the recoil (is that what it’s called?) that brings it back to the original position. The kids don’t care, but I’d love to tinker with it to see if I can get it working.
I’ve had a hard time dating this thing. Most of the 1543 models that I’ve found have a newer receiver and seem to date in the 1960s, but this one looks like the receiver off of the earlier models. The other interesting thing is that there is a label on the bottom that says, "Dialing for Dollars." That didn’t mean much of anything to me when I bought the phone, but I’ve since found out that it was a franchised format TV show that aired in the 50s, 60s, and 70s. It was a game show where the host would call viewers by randomly selecting a phone number out of a bowl, and dial it. If the viewer was home and watching, they would tell the host the password that was given at the beginning of the show, in order to win prize money. I love finding things with a bit of a story—for $5.99, this was a really fun piece to add to our home!

[ FRIDAY FIND: DIALING FOR DOLLARS ]

I’ve been keeping my eyes open for one of these phones for a while, this one is a vintage Stromberg Carlson 1543w, to go along with our vintage Royal typewriter. Our kids play “office” all the time, and I knew they’d love to have a phone to add to their setup. This thing is super heavy—the weight of the receiver in my hand makes modern technology seem cheap. Though most of the phone is in really nice condition, the dial is not working properly. It will spin if you give it some muscle, but it doesn’t have the recoil (is that what it’s called?) that brings it back to the original position. The kids don’t care, but I’d love to tinker with it to see if I can get it working.

I’ve had a hard time dating this thing. Most of the 1543 models that I’ve found have a newer receiver and seem to date in the 1960s, but this one looks like the receiver off of the earlier models. The other interesting thing is that there is a label on the bottom that says, "Dialing for Dollars." That didn’t mean much of anything to me when I bought the phone, but I’ve since found out that it was a franchised format TV show that aired in the 50s, 60s, and 70s. It was a game show where the host would call viewers by randomly selecting a phone number out of a bowl, and dial it. If the viewer was home and watching, they would tell the host the password that was given at the beginning of the show, in order to win prize money. I love finding things with a bit of a story—for $5.99, this was a really fun piece to add to our home!

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[ THE RE STORE ] 
Today I had some extra time and one less child in tow, since Alden was in school, so I decided to stop by the RE Store in Ballard. I often forget about this treasure trove, though it really should be in my thrifting rotation. If you’ve never heard of the RE Store, here’s the concept in a nutshell (from their website):

We save disposal costs for homeowners, builders, and business owners, while providing high quality building materials at discounted prices. This creates jobs and opportunities for reuse, education and innovation at every step of the process

Here is a list of their goals:
 Divert usable materials from land fills
Offer affordable used building materials to everyone
Save money for homeowners and contractors on their disposal and labor costs 
Empower and inspire community members to build skills in home remodeling and business improvements 
Give customers the good feeling that comes with wise stewardship of building resource
The list of things I was looking for was pretty short. Mostly, I was interested in their lighting section. The previous owner’s “makeover” on our house included some really terrible wall sconces in our hallway. Not only are they ugly, they stick out about a foot from the wall, so they are really awkward and intrusive.

Though I didn’t find exactly what I was looking for, I did see these sconces (three of them) for $8/each. They actually look like something that could have easily been in our house when it was originally built in 1976. I’m sending Patrick over to take a look at them this afternoon since his office is only three blocks from the store. The only drawback to these sconces is that the light they provide will be more directional instead of ambient—what our space really needs. But until we can afford lights like this, these will be a big improvement from the current light daggers sticking out of our wall.
Note: As far as I can tell, the RE Store in Ballard is not affiliated with the Habitat for Humanities ReStores that are located across the country.

[ THE RE STORE ]

Today I had some extra time and one less child in tow, since Alden was in school, so I decided to stop by the RE Store in Ballard. I often forget about this treasure trove, though it really should be in my thrifting rotation. If you’ve never heard of the RE Store, here’s the concept in a nutshell (from their website):

We save disposal costs for homeowners, builders, and business owners, while providing high quality building materials at discounted prices. This creates jobs and opportunities for reuse, education and innovation at every step of the process

Here is a list of their goals:

  • Divert usable materials from land fills
  • Offer affordable used building materials to everyone
  • Save money for homeowners and contractors on their disposal and labor costs
  • Empower and inspire community members to build skills in home remodeling and business improvements
  • Give customers the good feeling that comes with wise stewardship of building resource

The list of things I was looking for was pretty short. Mostly, I was interested in their lighting section. The previous owner’s “makeover” on our house included some really terrible wall sconces in our hallway. Not only are they ugly, they stick out about a foot from the wall, so they are really awkward and intrusive.

Though I didn’t find exactly what I was looking for, I did see these sconces (three of them) for $8/each. They actually look like something that could have easily been in our house when it was originally built in 1976. I’m sending Patrick over to take a look at them this afternoon since his office is only three blocks from the store. The only drawback to these sconces is that the light they provide will be more directional instead of ambient—what our space really needs. But until we can afford lights like this, these will be a big improvement from the current light daggers sticking out of our wall.

Note: As far as I can tell, the RE Store in Ballard is not affiliated with the Habitat for Humanities ReStores that are located across the country.

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