modern thrifter

modern thrifter

Thrifter & designer. Blogging about life in our MCM home & living on a budget. I also design things with my husband. You can see our work at The Mahoney Studio

[ EDISON ]
If you’ve never heard of Edison, Washington, you shouldn’t be surprised. This small town in the Skagit Valley has a mere 133 residents, according to the 2010 census. But even with such a small population, Edison has a lot to offer.

We drove up for the afternoon to celebrate our anniversary, after hearing so many good things about the cafes that line the one main road through town. Our first stop was Farm to Market Bakery for lunch, and we were not disappointed. I won’t ramble on about the food—there are plenty of online reviews—but it was worth the drive. 
We had heard a lot about the gourmet fare in Edison, but we were surprised that no one had mentioned the three or four galleries and artist studios in town, too. There was a really great printmaking exhibit at Smith & Vallee and while walking through, I turned a corner and stood face-to-face with this:

For those of you who haven’t met my husband in person, let me just say, the stranger in the print must be Patrick’s doppelgänger. I wonder if the other patrons in the gallery at the same time as us noticed it. 
The day before we visited Edison there was a community-wide garage sale (I’m still a little bummed about missing it), so there were a few leftover sales happening while we were there.  One of the best discoveries was a tent sale outside of Smith & Vallee that was filled with surplus wood slabs. I was desperately trying to think of a project that would justify a big chunk of black walnut, but I’m sure it would have sat in some sad corner of the house waiting indefinitely for me to do something with it. 

At the same sale, Patrick found a nice mat-cutter—something he’s been wanting for years —for $10. Now we have absolutely no excuse for the lack of art on our walls. 


We browsed the other shops in town which were filled with handmade art and crafts—not at all the kind you’d expect in a small farm town, but more along the lines of what you’d find in Ballard. Then, on our way to Tweets for pastries and coffee, we spotted a “free” pile, stacked in front of a little shop. We scooped up a few spools of nice yarn and a small wool cabbie hat for Alden. It was a pleasant surprise to be able to bring home a few goodies from an already delightful experience.

[ EDISON ]

If you’ve never heard of Edison, Washington, you shouldn’t be surprised. This small town in the Skagit Valley has a mere 133 residents, according to the 2010 census. But even with such a small population, Edison has a lot to offer.

We drove up for the afternoon to celebrate our anniversary, after hearing so many good things about the cafes that line the one main road through town. Our first stop was Farm to Market Bakery for lunch, and we were not disappointed. I won’t ramble on about the food—there are plenty of online reviews—but it was worth the drive. 

We had heard a lot about the gourmet fare in Edison, but we were surprised that no one had mentioned the three or four galleries and artist studios in town, too. There was a really great printmaking exhibit at Smith & Vallee and while walking through, I turned a corner and stood face-to-face with this:

For those of you who haven’t met my husband in person, let me just say, the stranger in the print must be Patrick’s doppelgänger. I wonder if the other patrons in the gallery at the same time as us noticed it. 

The day before we visited Edison there was a community-wide garage sale (I’m still a little bummed about missing it), so there were a few leftover sales happening while we were there.  One of the best discoveries was a tent sale outside of Smith & Vallee that was filled with surplus wood slabs. I was desperately trying to think of a project that would justify a big chunk of black walnut, but I’m sure it would have sat in some sad corner of the house waiting indefinitely for me to do something with it. 

At the same sale, Patrick found a nice mat-cutter—something he’s been wanting for years —for $10. Now we have absolutely no excuse for the lack of art on our walls. 

We browsed the other shops in town which were filled with handmade art and crafts—not at all the kind you’d expect in a small farm town, but more along the lines of what you’d find in Ballard. Then, on our way to Tweets for pastries and coffee, we spotted a “free” pile, stacked in front of a little shop. We scooped up a few spools of nice yarn and a small wool cabbie hat for Alden. It was a pleasant surprise to be able to bring home a few goodies from an already delightful experience.

Comments
[ ARE WE THERE YET ]
I found this Rand McNally travel activity book a few weeks ago while doing a quick scan of the kid’s book section at Goodwill. I pulled it off the shelf assuming it would be mostly used, torn, or at the very least, scribbled upon. To my delight, it is in near perfect condition. The middle even has an entire section of perforated stamp/stickers with beautiful one-color illustrations that have never been torn.


The book was designed in 1971 by Bradford/Cout Design, which at one time was based in Illinois. There is virtually no information regarding this company, and as best as I can gather, they folded up shop in the early 2000s. This is the only other thing that I have been able to find online that was designed by them.
Here is one of many game pages in the book:

The secondary illustrations were done by Dorothy Milikan & Terry Rose, and while I prefer the more graphic illustrations done by Bradford/Cout, I think they managed to integrate the two styles quite well, as you can see in this diagram:

Of all the pages in the book (this being just a small selection), this spread is my favorite:

I love how good design is so timeless. I plan to keep this high on the shelf in order to keep excited little hands off of those stamps and games, but I do plan to make some color copies to use in the car for our next long road trip. 

[ ARE WE THERE YET ]

I found this Rand McNally travel activity book a few weeks ago while doing a quick scan of the kid’s book section at Goodwill. I pulled it off the shelf assuming it would be mostly used, torn, or at the very least, scribbled upon. To my delight, it is in near perfect condition. The middle even has an entire section of perforated stamp/stickers with beautiful one-color illustrations that have never been torn.

The book was designed in 1971 by Bradford/Cout Design, which at one time was based in Illinois. There is virtually no information regarding this company, and as best as I can gather, they folded up shop in the early 2000s. This is the only other thing that I have been able to find online that was designed by them.

Here is one of many game pages in the book:

The secondary illustrations were done by Dorothy Milikan & Terry Rose, and while I prefer the more graphic illustrations done by Bradford/Cout, I think they managed to integrate the two styles quite well, as you can see in this diagram:

Of all the pages in the book (this being just a small selection), this spread is my favorite:

I love how good design is so timeless. I plan to keep this high on the shelf in order to keep excited little hands off of those stamps and games, but I do plan to make some color copies to use in the car for our next long road trip. 

Comments
[ ADRIFT ]
We’ve been anxious to get out of the city lately, and since last week was Alden’s spring break, we decided to head to Long Beach. Nope, not that one. Long Beach, Washington—a cold, rainy, windy beach this time of year. The kind of beach where swimsuits are only donned in the hotel bathtub and flip-flops are passed over in favor of rain boots. 
I am normally not a proponent of sites like Groupon and Living Social (I’ll save you the rant), but we made an exception for a deal offered by a hotel that we’d been on the fence about trying. Adrift Hotel was recently remodeled by husband and wife owners with a vision for a modern, fun, and affordable beach hotel. 
The deal we purchased was for a two-night stay (we upgraded to a larger room), a four-pack of micro brewed beer, a wood-fired pizza from the hotel’s new restaurant, a picnic breakfast delivered to our door each morning, and a box of chocolates. All total—including tax and the upgrade—we spent $210. 

Our room was in the East building, which is separate from the lobby and restaurant. Though, this building wasn’t remodeled as nicely as the other, we chose it because it has a few rooms with extra bedrooms and bunk beds. There are bunk beds in the other building, as well, but judging by the photos on their site, there is only one small rail on the side of the top bed, which pretty much guarantees one of the kids would end up with a broken bone. The room we chose had a queen bed in the main room with a twin/full bunk bed combo in the second room.
I would warn anyone planning on staying at the Adrift, the walls are extremely thin. We were thankful to be a corner room on the top floor, but we pity whoever was next to/beneath us. Our kids are kids after all, and there is only so much tiptoeing they can do. They also like to wake up at 5:45am on Saturday mornings.
The noise problems weren’t enough to keep us from having a great weekend. The hotel staff was friendly and helpful, there were plenty of beach cruiser bikes available to borrow at no charge in the lobby, and a decent collection of games and movies to take back to the room. We had a nice ocean view from all the windows in our room, and we appreciated the organic shampoo, conditioner, lotion, and soap that were in eco-friendly refillable containers instead of wasteful, single-use plastic ones. 

The food in the breakfast basket was delicious, and though meant to feed two, with a little extra fruit that we brought from home, it was plenty to fill all four of us. There is also complimentary fresh-brewed organic coffee in the lobby nearly around the clock, which was especially helpful for those early mornings. The wine, beer, and snacks available for purchase in the lobby were also nice quality and reasonably priced. 
In the end, I would say that the hotel has a few kinks to work out—housekeeping standards and noise issues being the most prominent, but bearing in mind this is their first year open, I think they are off to a good start. Adrift is not a luxury, boutique hotel, a fact they’ve fairly reflected in the price. It is a friendly, stylish, and affordable place to roost for a few days while bike riding and kite flying on the beach. 
What family vacation is complete without family photos? After leaving Long Beach, we took a little detour in Oregon and stopped at the Astoria Coffeehouse and Bistro for lunch. The food was amazing and our table was right in front of their beautiful tin-tiled wall—a perfect backdrop for a few snapshots. 

I took a plethora of photos over the weekend because I purchased a great new app for my iPhone that was just released last week from Visual Supply Co. It’s their mobile photo editing app, VSCO Cam. It’s lightyears beyond the capabilities of Instagram, and it was really fun to use while we were at such beautiful locations.

[ ADRIFT ]

We’ve been anxious to get out of the city lately, and since last week was Alden’s spring break, we decided to head to Long Beach. Nope, not that one. Long Beach, Washington—a cold, rainy, windy beach this time of year. The kind of beach where swimsuits are only donned in the hotel bathtub and flip-flops are passed over in favor of rain boots. 

I am normally not a proponent of sites like Groupon and Living Social (I’ll save you the rant), but we made an exception for a deal offered by a hotel that we’d been on the fence about trying. Adrift Hotel was recently remodeled by husband and wife owners with a vision for a modern, fun, and affordable beach hotel. 

The deal we purchased was for a two-night stay (we upgraded to a larger room), a four-pack of micro brewed beer, a wood-fired pizza from the hotel’s new restaurant, a picnic breakfast delivered to our door each morning, and a box of chocolates. All total—including tax and the upgrade—we spent $210. 

Our room was in the East building, which is separate from the lobby and restaurant. Though, this building wasn’t remodeled as nicely as the other, we chose it because it has a few rooms with extra bedrooms and bunk beds. There are bunk beds in the other building, as well, but judging by the photos on their site, there is only one small rail on the side of the top bed, which pretty much guarantees one of the kids would end up with a broken bone. The room we chose had a queen bed in the main room with a twin/full bunk bed combo in the second room.

I would warn anyone planning on staying at the Adrift, the walls are extremely thin. We were thankful to be a corner room on the top floor, but we pity whoever was next to/beneath us. Our kids are kids after all, and there is only so much tiptoeing they can do. They also like to wake up at 5:45am on Saturday mornings.

The noise problems weren’t enough to keep us from having a great weekend. The hotel staff was friendly and helpful, there were plenty of beach cruiser bikes available to borrow at no charge in the lobby, and a decent collection of games and movies to take back to the room. We had a nice ocean view from all the windows in our room, and we appreciated the organic shampoo, conditioner, lotion, and soap that were in eco-friendly refillable containers instead of wasteful, single-use plastic ones. 

The food in the breakfast basket was delicious, and though meant to feed two, with a little extra fruit that we brought from home, it was plenty to fill all four of us. There is also complimentary fresh-brewed organic coffee in the lobby nearly around the clock, which was especially helpful for those early mornings. The wine, beer, and snacks available for purchase in the lobby were also nice quality and reasonably priced. 

In the end, I would say that the hotel has a few kinks to work out—housekeeping standards and noise issues being the most prominent, but bearing in mind this is their first year open, I think they are off to a good start. Adrift is not a luxury, boutique hotel, a fact they’ve fairly reflected in the price. It is a friendly, stylish, and affordable place to roost for a few days while bike riding and kite flying on the beach. 

What family vacation is complete without family photos? After leaving Long Beach, we took a little detour in Oregon and stopped at the Astoria Coffeehouse and Bistro for lunch. The food was amazing and our table was right in front of their beautiful tin-tiled wall—a perfect backdrop for a few snapshots. 

I took a plethora of photos over the weekend because I purchased a great new app for my iPhone that was just released last week from Visual Supply Co. It’s their mobile photo editing app, VSCO Cam. It’s lightyears beyond the capabilities of Instagram, and it was really fun to use while we were at such beautiful locations.

Comments
[ VACATION FIND ]
I forgot to share this teak tray that I picked up when we were in Montana. It’s labeled Anri Form Italy on the bottom, which might sound familiar. My dad’s chess set is also made by Anri, though I didn’t realize they were both from the same maker until after we returned home. 

Anri seems to be primarily a wooden figurine company now, but I have seen several beautiful mid century bowls, trays, and ceramic/wood pieces that I’d love to stumble upon. This collection is my favorite:

The tray is the perfect size for a loaf of bread, and looks even better with a 49¢ thrifted tea towel. It’s always fun to add a little pattern and color to the dinner table. 

[ VACATION FIND ]

I forgot to share this teak tray that I picked up when we were in Montana. It’s labeled Anri Form Italy on the bottom, which might sound familiar. My dad’s chess set is also made by Anri, though I didn’t realize they were both from the same maker until after we returned home. 

image

Anri seems to be primarily a wooden figurine company now, but I have seen several beautiful mid century bowls, trays, and ceramic/wood pieces that I’d love to stumble upon. This collection is my favorite:

image

The tray is the perfect size for a loaf of bread, and looks even better with a 49¢ thrifted tea towel. It’s always fun to add a little pattern and color to the dinner table. 

image

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[ FOUR SWEET YEARS ]
Tula turned four while we were on vacation in Montana. It actually worked out perfectly to have her birthday party at my sister’s house because Tula’s cousin, Eila, is her best friend. Tula has been talking about having a Candyland birthday party for several months, but since we were traveling, I kept the party pretty simple. 


We made giant lollypops out of paper plates and then colored the swirls with markers. The peppermint sticks were made from rolled up butcher paper and red masking tape. I decided to put the favors out in mason jars and have the kids fill their own bags like they were at a real candy store. 


Of course I had to make paper bunting. It’s just so easy and inexpensive it’s become my go-to party decoration. As for the cake, well, that was nearly a flop. It came out much too moist and when I inverted the pan, it sort of just dropped out in chunks. I was about to tearfully start over, but my sweet, optimistic sister convinced me to scoop the pieces together into something vaguely resembling a rectangle and pop it in the freezer. With a lot of buttercream and some candy-striped ribbon, we were able to create a pretty cute cake. I think the look on Tula’s face is proof enough. 

I should also note that Tula’s cute party dress came from Goodwill. I picked it up last month for $4, looking brand new. I noticed that one of the snaps in the back wasn’t attached very well, but I figured I could replace it with a button. When I showed it Patrick, he grabbed his tool box and managed to squeeze the metal pieces back together like new. One week later I went into Target and saw a rack of the same dresses priced at $14. 

Eila’s adorable “bubble gum” dress was handmade by one of my sister’s friends. It kind of makes me want to be four again.

[ FOUR SWEET YEARS ]

Tula turned four while we were on vacation in Montana. It actually worked out perfectly to have her birthday party at my sister’s house because Tula’s cousin, Eila, is her best friend. Tula has been talking about having a Candyland birthday party for several months, but since we were traveling, I kept the party pretty simple. 

We made giant lollypops out of paper plates and then colored the swirls with markers. The peppermint sticks were made from rolled up butcher paper and red masking tape. I decided to put the favors out in mason jars and have the kids fill their own bags like they were at a real candy store. 

Of course I had to make paper bunting. It’s just so easy and inexpensive it’s become my go-to party decoration. As for the cake, well, that was nearly a flop. It came out much too moist and when I inverted the pan, it sort of just dropped out in chunks. I was about to tearfully start over, but my sweet, optimistic sister convinced me to scoop the pieces together into something vaguely resembling a rectangle and pop it in the freezer. With a lot of buttercream and some candy-striped ribbon, we were able to create a pretty cute cake. I think the look on Tula’s face is proof enough. 

I should also note that Tula’s cute party dress came from Goodwill. I picked it up last month for $4, looking brand new. I noticed that one of the snaps in the back wasn’t attached very well, but I figured I could replace it with a button. When I showed it Patrick, he grabbed his tool box and managed to squeeze the metal pieces back together like new. One week later I went into Target and saw a rack of the same dresses priced at $14. 

Eila’s adorable “bubble gum” dress was handmade by one of my sister’s friends. It kind of makes me want to be four again.

Comments
[ SUMMER IN MONTANA ]
We’ve just returned this weekend from a two week vacation in Montana. I always have naive intentions to blog while we’re away, thinking that I’ll have all sorts of free time. But in truth, we stay pretty busy and when we do relax, being online doesn’t seem all that enticing. Instead of sitting in front of a computer, we visited Lost Lake (pictured above), canoed the Missouri, soaked at Norris Hot Springs, hiked to Palisade falls, and Tula even made the local newspaper in Bozeman on her birthday. 
Now that we’re back, I have a long list of posts to write, but I’m trying to stay disciplined and take care of things like unpacking and laundry first. I promise there is good stuff coming, though… white floor photos, a Candyland birthday, and thrifty finds from Montana. 
Thanks for being patient while we soaked up a little summer!

[ SUMMER IN MONTANA ]

We’ve just returned this weekend from a two week vacation in Montana. I always have naive intentions to blog while we’re away, thinking that I’ll have all sorts of free time. But in truth, we stay pretty busy and when we do relax, being online doesn’t seem all that enticing. Instead of sitting in front of a computer, we visited Lost Lake (pictured above), canoed the Missouri, soaked at Norris Hot Springs, hiked to Palisade falls, and Tula even made the local newspaper in Bozeman on her birthday. 

Now that we’re back, I have a long list of posts to write, but I’m trying to stay disciplined and take care of things like unpacking and laundry first. I promise there is good stuff coming, though… white floor photos, a Candyland birthday, and thrifty finds from Montana. 

Thanks for being patient while we soaked up a little summer!

Comments
[ THRIFTING IN HAWAII ]
Actually, it was more like relaxing, surfing, touring, and snorkeling in Hawaii, with a side of thrifting. Last week we dropped the kids off with my in-laws for five days, and flew to Maui to celebrate our ten year wedding anniversary.
I always like to check out the local thrift stores when we travel, and usually find great souvenirs to bring home. This time, we struck out—hard. Of the three stores we hit, two were filled with mostly clothes and junky knick-knacks, and the third (pictured above) takes the prize for craziest, smelliest, scariest thrift store I have EVER been in. 
I did come across a thrifting first… old cakes from Safeway, stacked in a shopping cart, being sold alongside the racks of clothes. 
Despite the bad thrift store experiences, our trip to Maui had plenty of highlights, but I’ll spare you the slideshow. Here are just a few of my favorite photos: 




I’m so thankful to my husband for working so hard to make this trip happen. It was a rare chance to get away sans kids, and I had a blast hanging out with my best friend. 
Be sure to check out this old post I wrote about how we take guilt-free vacations.

[ THRIFTING IN HAWAII ]

Actually, it was more like relaxing, surfing, touring, and snorkeling in Hawaii, with a side of thrifting. Last week we dropped the kids off with my in-laws for five days, and flew to Maui to celebrate our ten year wedding anniversary.

I always like to check out the local thrift stores when we travel, and usually find great souvenirs to bring home. This time, we struck out—hard. Of the three stores we hit, two were filled with mostly clothes and junky knick-knacks, and the third (pictured above) takes the prize for craziest, smelliest, scariest thrift store I have EVER been in. 

I did come across a thrifting first… old cakes from Safeway, stacked in a shopping cart, being sold alongside the racks of clothes. 

Despite the bad thrift store experiences, our trip to Maui had plenty of highlights, but I’ll spare you the slideshow. Here are just a few of my favorite photos: 

I’m so thankful to my husband for working so hard to make this trip happen. It was a rare chance to get away sans kids, and I had a blast hanging out with my best friend. 

Be sure to check out this old post I wrote about how we take guilt-free vacations.

Comments
[ BARTERING ]
I mentioned in an earlier post that we recently spent a few days in Portland, relaxing after our very emotional Montana trip. We were able to stay in a guest cottage free of charge, thanks to a little deal we worked out with Katy over at The Non-Consumer Advocate. Jump on over to her site and take a look at the new blog header that Patrick designed as our part of the deal.
What I loved most about this deal, besides getting the opportunity to meet a blog friend in person, was that Katy managed to figure out a way to trade services for every step in getting her new header up and running. Actually, I had no idea how many people were involved in the process.
The great thing about bartering is that it doesn’t always have to be an even dollar-for-dollar trade. It’s more about what something is worth to you, how much you want it, or how much you are willing to help someone out. If you love to barter, I’d love to hear other creative bartering stories.

[ BARTERING ]

I mentioned in an earlier post that we recently spent a few days in Portland, relaxing after our very emotional Montana trip. We were able to stay in a guest cottage free of charge, thanks to a little deal we worked out with Katy over at The Non-Consumer Advocate. Jump on over to her site and take a look at the new blog header that Patrick designed as our part of the deal.

What I loved most about this deal, besides getting the opportunity to meet a blog friend in person, was that Katy managed to figure out a way to trade services for every step in getting her new header up and running. Actually, I had no idea how many people were involved in the process.

The great thing about bartering is that it doesn’t always have to be an even dollar-for-dollar trade. It’s more about what something is worth to you, how much you want it, or how much you are willing to help someone out. If you love to barter, I’d love to hear other creative bartering stories.

Comments
[ VACATION FINDS ]
It’s been a tradition for the last few years that when we take a trip somewhere, we try to squeeze in at least one stop at a local thrift store. On our latest trip to Montana, we discovered that the little thrift store in my hometown has a new owner. Since taking the reigns, he has managed to clean and organize the shop, and it is actually now possible to walk through the aisles. This might not sound like much of a feat, but take a look at the photos from the last time we were there. The other good news is that he is motivated to get rid of merchandise and completely willing to give a deal.
Here is a short list of the things we found:


Leather duffel bag set, $10. These are super soft and great quality.
Vintage Lamp, $1. I bought this to sell, in hopes of making a little extra money to put toward our chair fund.
Vintage Newspapers, $1 each. We picked up four of these, but gifted two of them to friends.
After our trip to Montana, we drove to Portland to spend a few days unwinding before returning to our normal responsibilities at home. We had a wonderful stay at a guest cottage, owned by the lovely mother of Katy (The Non-Consumer Advocate).
There just so happened to be a garage sale across the street from the cottage one morning, and here’s what we found there:

Vintage Suitcases, 10¢ each. I use these to store sewing and craft supplies.
Box of tights for Tula, $3. There were about 12 Hanna Andersson tights in various patterns.

[ VACATION FINDS ]

It’s been a tradition for the last few years that when we take a trip somewhere, we try to squeeze in at least one stop at a local thrift store. On our latest trip to Montana, we discovered that the little thrift store in my hometown has a new owner. Since taking the reigns, he has managed to clean and organize the shop, and it is actually now possible to walk through the aisles. This might not sound like much of a feat, but take a look at the photos from the last time we were there. The other good news is that he is motivated to get rid of merchandise and completely willing to give a deal.

Here is a short list of the things we found:

  • Leather duffel bag set, $10. These are super soft and great quality.
  • Vintage Lamp, $1. I bought this to sell, in hopes of making a little extra money to put toward our chair fund.
  • Vintage Newspapers, $1 each. We picked up four of these, but gifted two of them to friends.

After our trip to Montana, we drove to Portland to spend a few days unwinding before returning to our normal responsibilities at home. We had a wonderful stay at a guest cottage, owned by the lovely mother of Katy (The Non-Consumer Advocate).

There just so happened to be a garage sale across the street from the cottage one morning, and here’s what we found there:

  • Vintage Suitcases, 10¢ each. I use these to store sewing and craft supplies.
  • Box of tights for Tula, $3. There were about 12 Hanna Andersson tights in various patterns.
Comments
[ THE MODERN THRIFTER DREAM VACATION ]
Okay, there are actually a lot of places I’d love to visit, but I’m trying to be realistic here and talk about a vacation that would actually fit in our budget. Patrick and I have been brainstorming some ideas for places to go for our 10-year wedding anniversary in a few months. I’m leaving the details up to him to plan (which totally goes against my controlling/planner personality), but last night, an idea popped into my head: Palm Springs.
I know it’s probably not the first place most people would think of going, and believe me, Hawaii, New York, and San Francisco are still the front-runners for us, but the idea of hitting a mid-century and thrifting mecca like Palm Springs is quite alluring.
I would definitely want to stay at the Ace Hotel. Here’s the description from their “Ace Suite”:

"King sized bed and upscale living room area with vintage furniture.  Bathroom with shower, tub and amenities from Rudy’s Barbershop. 42”  flatscreens and MP3 plug. Vinyl record players in room. Private patio  with fireplace and lounge area."



I also found this great list of Palm Springs “Mod Shopping” resources.
I think there are only two hitches in this vacation plan… first, our anniversary is in June—not exactly the coolest time of year to visit the desert, and second, we’d probably need to fly which would greatly reduce the amount of thrifted goodies we could bring back with us. This vacation might just need to be mentally filed away and planned for a mid-winter getaway some year.
What is your “thrifter’s dream vacation?”

[ THE MODERN THRIFTER DREAM VACATION ]

Okay, there are actually a lot of places I’d love to visit, but I’m trying to be realistic here and talk about a vacation that would actually fit in our budget. Patrick and I have been brainstorming some ideas for places to go for our 10-year wedding anniversary in a few months. I’m leaving the details up to him to plan (which totally goes against my controlling/planner personality), but last night, an idea popped into my head: Palm Springs.

I know it’s probably not the first place most people would think of going, and believe me, Hawaii, New York, and San Francisco are still the front-runners for us, but the idea of hitting a mid-century and thrifting mecca like Palm Springs is quite alluring.

I would definitely want to stay at the Ace Hotel. Here’s the description from their “Ace Suite”:

"King sized bed and upscale living room area with vintage furniture. Bathroom with shower, tub and amenities from Rudy’s Barbershop. 42” flatscreens and MP3 plug. Vinyl record players in room. Private patio with fireplace and lounge area."

I also found this great list of Palm Springs “Mod Shopping” resources.

I think there are only two hitches in this vacation plan… first, our anniversary is in June—not exactly the coolest time of year to visit the desert, and second, we’d probably need to fly which would greatly reduce the amount of thrifted goodies we could bring back with us. This vacation might just need to be mentally filed away and planned for a mid-winter getaway some year.

What is your “thrifter’s dream vacation?”

Comments