modern thrifter

modern thrifter

Thrifter & designer. Blogging about life in our MCM home & living on a budget. I also design things with my husband. You can see our work at The Mahoney Studio

[ DESIGN DUAL ]
It shouldn’t come as a surprise that I rarely buy brand new things around here. In fact, with the exception of a few items, most of my home is a menagerie of second-hand beauties that I’ve slowly pieced together over the years. So when Hilary at Pulp Design asked me to participate in a design challenge where I would choose items for a bedside table, I gladly accepted. Putting together fictional rooms with items that I would never otherwise purchase is something I’ve practiced since I was a little girl with a pair of scissors and the Sears catalog.
These are a few things that I would gladly put in my bedroom if I had an extra couple thousand dollars lying around. You can see the rest of my picks, as well as the very different choices that Amy of Parker Etc. put together, over on the Hello Splendor blog. 

[ DESIGN DUAL ]

It shouldn’t come as a surprise that I rarely buy brand new things around here. In fact, with the exception of a few items, most of my home is a menagerie of second-hand beauties that I’ve slowly pieced together over the years. So when Hilary at Pulp Design asked me to participate in a design challenge where I would choose items for a bedside table, I gladly accepted. Putting together fictional rooms with items that I would never otherwise purchase is something I’ve practiced since I was a little girl with a pair of scissors and the Sears catalog.

These are a few things that I would gladly put in my bedroom if I had an extra couple thousand dollars lying around. You can see the rest of my picks, as well as the very different choices that Amy of Parker Etc. put together, over on the Hello Splendor blog. 

Comments
[ AURORA ANTIQUE PAVILION ]

Wow, sorry about all of the cobwebs over here on the blog. I’ve been doing a bit of design work the past couple of weeks, so thrifting and blogging have taken a back seat for the time being. I’ll share the projects with you all when they’re done. I’m pretty excited about them and it’s been a refreshing change to get my hands back into drawing and designing. Just to clarify, those are Patrick’s hands in the picture, though, not mine.  

In the middle of all of the busyness I did find time to take a quick peek inside the Aurora Antique Pavilion with Patrick. It’s been about ten years since the last time we’d been inside, and I sort of forgot about its existence until a friend mentioned it recently.



Let me tell you, this is the type of place that you need the better part of an afternoon to explore. We only had an hour and we tried our best to scan it all, but I know we missed plenty.

My overall (quick) impression is that this is the place to go if you are looking for Pyrex or other kitchenwares. The prices on most of the Pyrex pieces weren’t much more than Goodwill has been charging these days. Also, I saw a ton of Hall china, but it was priced pretty average. 





I was tempted to buy this vintage poker chip set, but our game collection (ahem… it’s almost an entire closet filled with games) is overflowing, so I passed.

Furniture was mostly pre-1950, but there were a few pieces of Mid-Mod scattered around. One area that is definitely worth a look is the furniture warehouse. This section felt like it was off-limits to the public, but apparently it is not. I guess it’s just “proceed at your own risk.” A lot of the furniture was already sold and awaiting pick-up, but there was still plenty for sale at pretty steep discounts. 





So what did I buy? I’ve been working on upgrading my cheap pots and pans to a mixture of All-Clad and cast iron. It’s been an expensive and slow transition, but every time I swap out a teflon-lined piece of junk for a heavy, even-cooking beauty, I know it’s worth it.





I found this vintage Le Creuset 22cm saucepan with a clever skillet lid, and I scooped it up. Well, actually I admired it for a while and walked away. It was Patrick who talked me into going back across the store and claiming it. I suppose his reasoning was two-fold: one, he loves me, two, he gets better food when I have tools for the kitchen that make me enjoy cooking even more.

I wonder how many local folks have been to the Antiques Pavilion? Is it just me who forgot about this fabulous place so awkwardly situated above the Burlington Coat Factory? I can’t wait to get a free morning to go back and dig through it all again.

[ AURORA ANTIQUE PAVILION ]

Wow, sorry about all of the cobwebs over here on the blog. I’ve been doing a bit of design work the past couple of weeks, so thrifting and blogging have taken a back seat for the time being. I’ll share the projects with you all when they’re done. I’m pretty excited about them and it’s been a refreshing change to get my hands back into drawing and designing. Just to clarify, those are Patrick’s hands in the picture, though, not mine.  

In the middle of all of the busyness I did find time to take a quick peek inside the Aurora Antique Pavilion with Patrick. It’s been about ten years since the last time we’d been inside, and I sort of forgot about its existence until a friend mentioned it recently.

Let me tell you, this is the type of place that you need the better part of an afternoon to explore. We only had an hour and we tried our best to scan it all, but I know we missed plenty.

My overall (quick) impression is that this is the place to go if you are looking for Pyrex or other kitchenwares. The prices on most of the Pyrex pieces weren’t much more than Goodwill has been charging these days. Also, I saw a ton of Hall china, but it was priced pretty average. 

I was tempted to buy this vintage poker chip set, but our game collection (ahem… it’s almost an entire closet filled with games) is overflowing, so I passed.

Furniture was mostly pre-1950, but there were a few pieces of Mid-Mod scattered around. One area that is definitely worth a look is the furniture warehouse. This section felt like it was off-limits to the public, but apparently it is not. I guess it’s just “proceed at your own risk.” A lot of the furniture was already sold and awaiting pick-up, but there was still plenty for sale at pretty steep discounts. 

So what did I buy? I’ve been working on upgrading my cheap pots and pans to a mixture of All-Clad and cast iron. It’s been an expensive and slow transition, but every time I swap out a teflon-lined piece of junk for a heavy, even-cooking beauty, I know it’s worth it.

I found this vintage Le Creuset 22cm saucepan with a clever skillet lid, and I scooped it up. Well, actually I admired it for a while and walked away. It was Patrick who talked me into going back across the store and claiming it. I suppose his reasoning was two-fold: one, he loves me, two, he gets better food when I have tools for the kitchen that make me enjoy cooking even more.

I wonder how many local folks have been to the Antiques Pavilion? Is it just me who forgot about this fabulous place so awkwardly situated above the Burlington Coat Factory? I can’t wait to get a free morning to go back and dig through it all again.

Comments
[ SPRAY PAINT OPTIONS ]
I currently have a lengthy list of objects awaiting a new coat of paint. After all, spray paint is one of the best ways to breathe new life into an old or beat-up thrift store find. I finally went ahead and prepped a set of vintage canisters, a napkin holder, and this vintage lamp, by cleaning and meticulously taping off the areas I want to leave the original finish. I went to Home Depot to buy Rustoleum primer and some fun colors, only to find out that the color selection was pretty limited. I couldn’t find anything close to what was looking for, so I reluctantly settled on a bright yellow, and purchased a high-gloss topcoat.
We applied a few coats of the primer a couple of weekends ago, but ran out of time before we were able to get to the yellow, so everything has been sitting in limbo—like so many of our projects—on a shelf in our carport. In the meantime, Patrick ran into another artist friend of ours, and they started talking about spray paint. He told us he gets all of his spray paint at Artist & Craftsman Supply in the U-District. I don’t know why this never occurred to us before. We go there for all of our other art supplies, but I guess since this paint was for home decor, my brain was thinking only about home improvement stores.
We took the family to Artist & Craftsman Supply yesterday and I was overjoyed at the color possibilities. The paint is made for graffiti… um… mural artists, so it’s very durable, plus I’ll add the lacquer topcoat to make it even stronger. I’m not going to tell you what color I picked, but I’m looking forward to finishing the projects so that I can share the pictures.

Our whole family loves visiting this store! It helps that both of my kids think sketchbooks and markers are some of the greatest things in the world. They also had fun playing with the moon sand that was out on display. By the way, isn’t this $2 thrifted  target dress just about the cutest thing ever?

[ SPRAY PAINT OPTIONS ]

I currently have a lengthy list of objects awaiting a new coat of paint. After all, spray paint is one of the best ways to breathe new life into an old or beat-up thrift store find. I finally went ahead and prepped a set of vintage canisters, a napkin holder, and this vintage lamp, by cleaning and meticulously taping off the areas I want to leave the original finish. I went to Home Depot to buy Rustoleum primer and some fun colors, only to find out that the color selection was pretty limited. I couldn’t find anything close to what was looking for, so I reluctantly settled on a bright yellow, and purchased a high-gloss topcoat.

We applied a few coats of the primer a couple of weekends ago, but ran out of time before we were able to get to the yellow, so everything has been sitting in limbo—like so many of our projects—on a shelf in our carport. In the meantime, Patrick ran into another artist friend of ours, and they started talking about spray paint. He told us he gets all of his spray paint at Artist & Craftsman Supply in the U-District. I don’t know why this never occurred to us before. We go there for all of our other art supplies, but I guess since this paint was for home decor, my brain was thinking only about home improvement stores.

We took the family to Artist & Craftsman Supply yesterday and I was overjoyed at the color possibilities. The paint is made for graffiti… um… mural artists, so it’s very durable, plus I’ll add the lacquer topcoat to make it even stronger. I’m not going to tell you what color I picked, but I’m looking forward to finishing the projects so that I can share the pictures.

Our whole family loves visiting this store! It helps that both of my kids think sketchbooks and markers are some of the greatest things in the world. They also had fun playing with the moon sand that was out on display. By the way, isn’t this $2 thrifted  target dress just about the cutest thing ever?

Comments
[ THE RE STORE ] 
Today I had some extra time and one less child in tow, since Alden was in school, so I decided to stop by the RE Store in Ballard. I often forget about this treasure trove, though it really should be in my thrifting rotation. If you’ve never heard of the RE Store, here’s the concept in a nutshell (from their website):

We save disposal costs for homeowners, builders, and business owners, while providing high quality building materials at discounted prices. This creates jobs and opportunities for reuse, education and innovation at every step of the process

Here is a list of their goals:
 Divert usable materials from land fills
Offer affordable used building materials to everyone
Save money for homeowners and contractors on their disposal and labor costs 
Empower and inspire community members to build skills in home remodeling and business improvements 
Give customers the good feeling that comes with wise stewardship of building resource
The list of things I was looking for was pretty short. Mostly, I was interested in their lighting section. The previous owner’s “makeover” on our house included some really terrible wall sconces in our hallway. Not only are they ugly, they stick out about a foot from the wall, so they are really awkward and intrusive.

Though I didn’t find exactly what I was looking for, I did see these sconces (three of them) for $8/each. They actually look like something that could have easily been in our house when it was originally built in 1976. I’m sending Patrick over to take a look at them this afternoon since his office is only three blocks from the store. The only drawback to these sconces is that the light they provide will be more directional instead of ambient—what our space really needs. But until we can afford lights like this, these will be a big improvement from the current light daggers sticking out of our wall.
Note: As far as I can tell, the RE Store in Ballard is not affiliated with the Habitat for Humanities ReStores that are located across the country.

[ THE RE STORE ]

Today I had some extra time and one less child in tow, since Alden was in school, so I decided to stop by the RE Store in Ballard. I often forget about this treasure trove, though it really should be in my thrifting rotation. If you’ve never heard of the RE Store, here’s the concept in a nutshell (from their website):

We save disposal costs for homeowners, builders, and business owners, while providing high quality building materials at discounted prices. This creates jobs and opportunities for reuse, education and innovation at every step of the process

Here is a list of their goals:

  • Divert usable materials from land fills
  • Offer affordable used building materials to everyone
  • Save money for homeowners and contractors on their disposal and labor costs
  • Empower and inspire community members to build skills in home remodeling and business improvements
  • Give customers the good feeling that comes with wise stewardship of building resource

The list of things I was looking for was pretty short. Mostly, I was interested in their lighting section. The previous owner’s “makeover” on our house included some really terrible wall sconces in our hallway. Not only are they ugly, they stick out about a foot from the wall, so they are really awkward and intrusive.

Though I didn’t find exactly what I was looking for, I did see these sconces (three of them) for $8/each. They actually look like something that could have easily been in our house when it was originally built in 1976. I’m sending Patrick over to take a look at them this afternoon since his office is only three blocks from the store. The only drawback to these sconces is that the light they provide will be more directional instead of ambient—what our space really needs. But until we can afford lights like this, these will be a big improvement from the current light daggers sticking out of our wall.

Note: As far as I can tell, the RE Store in Ballard is not affiliated with the Habitat for Humanities ReStores that are located across the country.

Comments
[ THE WHITE ATTIC ]
I’ve heard that Chicago is a beautiful city—one that I would very much like to visit, especially to check out some of the secondhand furniture stores that I keep reading about. Really, there’s nothing quite the same in Seattle.
Take, for example, The White Attic. The owner, Terry Ledford, hand selects each piece, which is then refinished or painted with low VOC materials. Need a lamp to go with that new credenza? Just check out their Lamp Bar, where you can pick the shape and color of the base, and complete it with a custom shade. With an array of patterns and colors, the possibilities are endless.

20 different base shapes, 30 base colors, 6 shade sizes, and 70 fabrics.


Since we have no plans of visiting the Windy City anytime soon, and The White Attic doesn’t ship, I like to look through the gallery (currently on facebook) for inspiration. It keeps me motivated to finish some of the furniture makeovers that are on my list.

[ THE WHITE ATTIC ]

I’ve heard that Chicago is a beautiful city—one that I would very much like to visit, especially to check out some of the secondhand furniture stores that I keep reading about. Really, there’s nothing quite the same in Seattle.

Take, for example, The White Attic. The owner, Terry Ledford, hand selects each piece, which is then refinished or painted with low VOC materials. Need a lamp to go with that new credenza? Just check out their Lamp Bar, where you can pick the shape and color of the base, and complete it with a custom shade. With an array of patterns and colors, the possibilities are endless.

20 different base shapes, 30 base colors, 6 shade sizes, and 70 fabrics.

Since we have no plans of visiting the Windy City anytime soon, and The White Attic doesn’t ship, I like to look through the gallery (currently on facebook) for inspiration. It keeps me motivated to finish some of the furniture makeovers that are on my list.

Comments
[ LOCAL SHOP:  BIRCH PAPERIE ]
It was a weekend full of cards—a preschool graduation card for Alden,   a birthday card for me, and father’s day cards for the dads in our   life. My new favorite card shop around is Birch Paperie in   Tangletown—that hard to describe section of Seattle that isn’t quite   wallingford, and not really greenlake, and is best known for it’s   bakeries and coffee shops. Birch Paperie is located next door to Mighty-O Donuts, and if you blink,   you’ll probably miss it. But don’t let the size of the shop fool you,   it’s packed with carefully selected letterpress cards, beautiful   patterned papers, and a few other handmade and luxurious items.


The first time I went in the shop, I expected the prices to be  pretty  high, but I was surprised to see that most of the the cards were  in the  $4 to $5 price range with a few as much as $7, but several in  the $3  range. If you’ve bought cards at Hallmark or practically any  other  retailer, you’ll know that most greeting cards these days—even  the most  basic—are at least $2 or $3. I’d much rather fork over an  extra buck to  support a local business, selling the work of mostly  local artists.

Patrick was able to stop by Birch on Friday to get the cards he   needed (isn’t the birthday card he and Tula picked out for me cute?!)   and I had planned to slip in after our usual Saturday morning donut   pilgrimage to pick up a father’s day card—yes, I know I’m a   procrastinator. Plans quickly changed when I woke up on Saturday, my   birthday, with food poisoning. Instead, I spent the morning curled up in   a ball, thinking my body was going to turn itself inside out.
Because the shop has very limited hours (it’s generally only open   Thursdays and Fridays 11–4, and Saturdays 9–2) I was out of luck this   holiday. The kids and I decided to go the homemade route, and put   together a card and some stories that they each wrote for their dad.


Good thing I have a few more family birthdays coming up, though, so   that I can still go card shopping. Maybe the Father’s day cards will   even be on sale. Stop by and check out the shop if you’re ever on the   hunt for the perfect card. It’s also a great excuse for a detour to   Mighty-O for arguably the best donut in town.

[ LOCAL SHOP:  BIRCH PAPERIE ]

It was a weekend full of cards—a preschool graduation card for Alden, a birthday card for me, and father’s day cards for the dads in our life. My new favorite card shop around is Birch Paperie in Tangletown—that hard to describe section of Seattle that isn’t quite wallingford, and not really greenlake, and is best known for it’s bakeries and coffee shops. Birch Paperie is located next door to Mighty-O Donuts, and if you blink, you’ll probably miss it. But don’t let the size of the shop fool you, it’s packed with carefully selected letterpress cards, beautiful patterned papers, and a few other handmade and luxurious items.

The first time I went in the shop, I expected the prices to be pretty high, but I was surprised to see that most of the the cards were in the $4 to $5 price range with a few as much as $7, but several in the $3 range. If you’ve bought cards at Hallmark or practically any other retailer, you’ll know that most greeting cards these days—even the most basic—are at least $2 or $3. I’d much rather fork over an extra buck to support a local business, selling the work of mostly local artists.

Patrick was able to stop by Birch on Friday to get the cards he needed (isn’t the birthday card he and Tula picked out for me cute?!) and I had planned to slip in after our usual Saturday morning donut pilgrimage to pick up a father’s day card—yes, I know I’m a procrastinator. Plans quickly changed when I woke up on Saturday, my birthday, with food poisoning. Instead, I spent the morning curled up in a ball, thinking my body was going to turn itself inside out.

Because the shop has very limited hours (it’s generally only open Thursdays and Fridays 11–4, and Saturdays 9–2) I was out of luck this holiday. The kids and I decided to go the homemade route, and put together a card and some stories that they each wrote for their dad.

Good thing I have a few more family birthdays coming up, though, so that I can still go card shopping. Maybe the Father’s day cards will even be on sale. Stop by and check out the shop if you’re ever on the hunt for the perfect card. It’s also a great excuse for a detour to Mighty-O for arguably the best donut in town.

Comments
[ A LA MODERN ] 
Last Friday I was doing a little research on the Kyes tray I bought at Deseret Industries, and I stumbled upon A La Modern, a fabulous little online shop started by two collectors, Bryan and Linda, with a love for “one-of-a-kind, special treasures that you can’t find in normal stores.” I think this would a great place to find unique and lovely gifts. I know I’ll be checking their inventory the next time I’m looking for a birthday or housewarming present. 
They are currently having a sale on their goods from Scandinavia. I don’t know what my recent obsession with salt & pepper shakers is all about, but I think these ones are really fun: Figgjo Lotte Shakers - $28 Here are a few other things from their site that I’m particularly fond of: Stelton Ice Bucket - $35

David Douglas Cups - $25 Upsala Ekeby Pitcher - $40

[ A LA MODERN ]

Last Friday I was doing a little research on the Kyes tray I bought at Deseret Industries, and I stumbled upon A La Modern, a fabulous little online shop started by two collectors, Bryan and Linda, with a love for “one-of-a-kind, special treasures that you can’t find in normal stores.” I think this would a great place to find unique and lovely gifts. I know I’ll be checking their inventory the next time I’m looking for a birthday or housewarming present.

They are currently having a sale on their goods from Scandinavia. I don’t know what my recent obsession with salt & pepper shakers is all about, but I think these ones are really fun:

Figgjo Lotte Shakers - $28
Here are a few other things from their site that I’m particularly fond of:

Stelton Ice Bucket - $35 David Douglas Cups - $25

Upsala Ekeby Pitcher - $40

Comments
[ MODERN DOORS ]We were fortunate enough with our recent home purchase to inherit this great front door. It is the original door on our 1976 northwest modern home. It’s starting to show some wear, but I expect it to last several more years. If the day comes that we do need to replace it, however, I know exactly where we’ll go. Just up the street from us is Frank Lumber, or better known as “The Door Store.”A few years ago, when we were living in our first house, we decided to upgrade our front door to something more modern. Not knowing any better, the first stop we made was at Home Depot. Although we never really dug too deeply into their custom order catalogs, we were pretty underwhelmed at our options. There were plenty of styles to choose from in the craftsman category, but not much that fit our tastes.We did our research and were thrilled to come across The Door Store. The service was outstanding and the options seemed limitless. We were also surprised that the prices didn’t seem that far off from what we had seen at the big retail giants. We were able to browse their selection of solid doors to pick out the wood grain we liked the best, choose where we wanted the window, and pick the kind (pattern) of glass—all without raising the price of the original door we saw in the showroom. We chose this simple, one window door.Here are just a few of the modern & midcentury door styles they offer:

[ MODERN DOORS ]We were fortunate enough with our recent home purchase to inherit this great front door. It is the original door on our 1976 northwest modern home. It’s starting to show some wear, but I expect it to last several more years. If the day comes that we do need to replace it, however, I know exactly where we’ll go. Just up the street from us is Frank Lumber, or better known as “The Door Store.”

A few years ago, when we were living in our first house, we decided to upgrade our front door to something more modern. Not knowing any better, the first stop we made was at Home Depot. Although we never really dug too deeply into their custom order catalogs, we were pretty underwhelmed at our options. There were plenty of styles to choose from in the craftsman category, but not much that fit our tastes.

We did our research and were thrilled to come across The Door Store. The service was outstanding and the options seemed limitless. We were also surprised that the prices didn’t seem that far off from what we had seen at the big retail giants. We were able to browse their selection of solid doors to pick out the wood grain we liked the best, choose where we wanted the window, and pick the kind (pattern) of glass—all without raising the price of the original door we saw in the showroom. We chose this simple, one window door.


Here are just a few of the modern & midcentury door styles they offer:


Comments
[ MODERN FABRIC RESOURCES ]
New fabric can be an inexpensive and great upgrade throughout your home. Use it for curtains, throw pillows, seat cushions (like my recent chair before & after), or stretch it on wood frames and hang it as art. Admittedly, I have a stash of fabric stuffed in the closet (aka: craft purgatory) awaiting the sewing machine and staple gun. Pictured above are a few pieces from the closet. The top pattern, which I picked up at a friend’s garage sale, is in queue to become curtains for my little girl’s bedroom.My two favorite places to find a wide selection of modern fabrics online are purl soho andreprodepot. But most of the time, I prefer to shop for fabric in person so that I can accurately see the pattern size, colors, and weight of the material. My favorite local shop is Pacific Fabrics (I like their parking), but when I get the chance I’d love to pop into Fabric Crush in Wallingford Center (Bonus:Trophy Cupcakes is right next door). If you are looking for some smaller pieces of fabric at a great price, Buttercuppity Fabric’s Etsy shop has a nice sale section, offering smaller yardage for $6.50/yd or less.above: Tulianen by Pia Holm for MarimekkoI’m still waiting for the perfect project that would justify a purchase of some Marimekko fabric [wiping drool off keyboard]. But for a tight budget, Ikea has some great modern designs for $7.99/yd or less.above: Ikea’s Fredrika fabric - $6.99/yd

[ MODERN FABRIC RESOURCES ]

New fabric can be an inexpensive and great upgrade throughout your home. Use it for curtains, throw pillows, seat cushions (like my recent chair before & after), or stretch it on wood frames and hang it as art. Admittedly, I have a stash of fabric stuffed in the closet (aka: craft purgatory) awaiting the sewing machine and staple gun. Pictured above are a few pieces from the closet. The top pattern, which I picked up at a friend’s garage sale, is in queue to become curtains for my little girl’s bedroom.

My two favorite places to find a wide selection of modern fabrics online are purl soho andreprodepot. But most of the time, I prefer to shop for fabric in person so that I can accurately see the pattern size, colors, and weight of the material. My favorite local shop is Pacific Fabrics (I like their parking), but when I get the chance I’d love to pop into Fabric Crush in Wallingford Center (Bonus:Trophy Cupcakes is right next door). If you are looking for some smaller pieces of fabric at a great price, Buttercuppity Fabric’s Etsy shop has a nice sale section, offering smaller yardage for $6.50/yd or less.


above: Tulianen by Pia Holm for Marimekko

I’m still waiting for the perfect project that would justify a purchase of some Marimekko fabric [wiping drool off keyboard]. But for a tight budget, Ikea has some great modern designs for $7.99/yd or less.
above: Ikea’s Fredrika fabric - $6.99/yd

Comments
[ BLUE CARROT SHOP ]
I came across Blue Carrot Shop the other day and fell in love. If you are searching for vintage and kitschy accessories, Alexandra, the shop’s owner, has plenty to choose from. The prices are obviously higher than what you’d find at the thrift store, but if you don’t have time to thrift, or maybe you just don’t like to, the price might just be worth it. Too bad I didn’t find her store until after those Helvetica salt and pepper shakers were sold!As a side note, I recently bought a vintage beater like the one pictured above at Goodwill for $0.69. It was a steal, and I love it so much I would have easily paid more money for it if I had to.

[ BLUE CARROT SHOP ]

I came across Blue Carrot Shop the other day and fell in love. If you are searching for vintage and kitschy accessories, Alexandra, the shop’s owner, has plenty to choose from. The prices are obviously higher than what you’d find at the thrift store, but if you don’t have time to thrift, or maybe you just don’t like to, the price might just be worth it. Too bad I didn’t find her store until after those Helvetica salt and pepper shakers were sold!

As a side note, I recently bought a vintage beater like the one pictured above at Goodwill for $0.69. It was a steal, and I love it so much I would have easily paid more money for it if I had to.

Comments