modern thrifter

modern thrifter

Thrifter & designer. Blogging about life in our MCM home & living on a budget. I also design things with my husband. You can see our work at The Mahoney Studio

[ FREE FUN ]
If you’re around Seattle Saturday, August 10th, there is some great free stuff happening in the South Lake Union neighborhood. West Elm will be giving away free scoops of Molly Moon’s ice cream (though I’m partial to Ice Cream Social’s ice cream. Unfortunately, they’re all the way in Tacoma, so it’s a much rarer treat).
Stick around until 9pm and catch a free outdoor movie at Lake Union Park. These are happening every Saturday night for the month of August. The movie selected for the night of the 10th is The Goonies!
If you want to kill time between the events you could stop by the new[ish] MOHAI location. We’ve never been, and I’ve been wanting to see the Celluloid Seattle exhibit there, especially since I discovered that it was curated by film critic Robert Horton. Then again, if you want to avoid the $14 adult ticket price (kids 14 and under are free), admission is free to everyone on the first Thursday of each month.
If you don’t happen to live in Seattle, well, you should. We have some of the best summers of anywhere in the nation. But really, wherever you are, check your community for other free events. There is always a lot happening this time of year. 

[ FREE FUN ]

If you’re around Seattle Saturday, August 10th, there is some great free stuff happening in the South Lake Union neighborhood. West Elm will be giving away free scoops of Molly Moon’s ice cream (though I’m partial to Ice Cream Social’s ice cream. Unfortunately, they’re all the way in Tacoma, so it’s a much rarer treat).

Stick around until 9pm and catch a free outdoor movie at Lake Union Park. These are happening every Saturday night for the month of August. The movie selected for the night of the 10th is The Goonies!

If you want to kill time between the events you could stop by the new[ish] MOHAI location. We’ve never been, and I’ve been wanting to see the Celluloid Seattle exhibit there, especially since I discovered that it was curated by film critic Robert Horton. Then again, if you want to avoid the $14 adult ticket price (kids 14 and under are free), admission is free to everyone on the first Thursday of each month.

If you don’t happen to live in Seattle, well, you should. We have some of the best summers of anywhere in the nation. But really, wherever you are, check your community for other free events. There is always a lot happening this time of year. 

Comments
[ Seppo Mallat & An Everlasting Meal ]
As a kid, I used to spend afternoons in my grandma’s kitchen learning how to make pies and bread, and how to cook and can chokecherry jelly. As an adult, I don’t love cooking everyday. There are evenings where it feels like just another chore and the meal is met with “do I really have to eat that?” looks on the kids’ faces. 
More often than not, though, I find a simple pleasure in food—both preparing and eating it. It’s even more enjoyable when I use tools for which I have a fondness, like my vintage Le Creuset sauce pan, my thrifted rolling pin, identical to the one my mom has used since my childhood, and now, my newly thrifted Seppo Mallat Finel sauté pan. 
I have always hoped to find Kobenstyle cookware at the thrift store, but have struck out thus far. I hadn’t ever seen the Finel cookware designed by Seppo Mallat until I snagged this pan off the shelf at Goodwill. Now, I am head over heels for the design. I like the modern straight sides of the designs in contrast to the more traditional shape of Kobenstyle. 
While my new pan makes me smile every time I use it, the book I’m currently reading, An Everlasting Meal, has me inspired and excited to cook up something new. Author Tamar Adler writes eloquently about the endless possibilities of the simplest foods. I found myself chuckling as she describes the elation of peeling a boiled egg in one swoop, and my mouth watering, craving a slice of garlicky toast at midnight when I’m reading in bed.
I have the book for another week from the library before I sadly have to return it. I think I will have to put this on my wish list, as I think it is an excellent resource to own.  
Here is an excerpt from Chapter 1: How to boil water

“There is a prevailing theory that we need to know much more than we do in order to feed ourselves well. It isn’t true. Most of us already have water, a pot to put it in, and a way to light a fire. This gives us boiling water, in which we can do more good cooking than we seem to realize.
Our culture frowns on cooking in water. A pot and water are both simple and homely. It is hard to improve on the technology of the pot, or of the boil, leaving, when it comes to this particular technique, nothing for the cookbook and cookware industries to sell.
The pot was invented 10,000 years ago, and a simmering one has been a symbol of a well-tended hearth every since. I don’t mean to suggest that now that you have been reminded of the age and goodness of a pot of water, you start boiling everything in your kitchen, but that instead of trying to figure out what to do about dinner, you put a big pot of water on the stove, light the burner under it, and then, as soon as it’s on its way to getting hot, start looking for things to put in it. Once you do, you will have dropped yourself, in a single gesture, directly into the middle of cooking a meal, jostled by your faith and will a few steps closer to dinner…”

[ Seppo Mallat & An Everlasting Meal ]

As a kid, I used to spend afternoons in my grandma’s kitchen learning how to make pies and bread, and how to cook and can chokecherry jelly. As an adult, I don’t love cooking everyday. There are evenings where it feels like just another chore and the meal is met with “do I really have to eat that?” looks on the kids’ faces. 

More often than not, though, I find a simple pleasure in food—both preparing and eating it. It’s even more enjoyable when I use tools for which I have a fondness, like my vintage Le Creuset sauce pan, my thrifted rolling pin, identical to the one my mom has used since my childhood, and now, my newly thrifted Seppo Mallat Finel sauté pan. 

I have always hoped to find Kobenstyle cookware at the thrift store, but have struck out thus far. I hadn’t ever seen the Finel cookware designed by Seppo Mallat until I snagged this pan off the shelf at Goodwill. Now, I am head over heels for the design. I like the modern straight sides of the designs in contrast to the more traditional shape of Kobenstyle. 

While my new pan makes me smile every time I use it, the book I’m currently reading, An Everlasting Meal, has me inspired and excited to cook up something new. Author Tamar Adler writes eloquently about the endless possibilities of the simplest foods. I found myself chuckling as she describes the elation of peeling a boiled egg in one swoop, and my mouth watering, craving a slice of garlicky toast at midnight when I’m reading in bed.

I have the book for another week from the library before I sadly have to return it. I think I will have to put this on my wish list, as I think it is an excellent resource to own.  

Here is an excerpt from Chapter 1: How to boil water

“There is a prevailing theory that we need to know much more than we do in order to feed ourselves well. It isn’t true. Most of us already have water, a pot to put it in, and a way to light a fire. This gives us boiling water, in which we can do more good cooking than we seem to realize.

Our culture frowns on cooking in water. A pot and water are both simple and homely. It is hard to improve on the technology of the pot, or of the boil, leaving, when it comes to this particular technique, nothing for the cookbook and cookware industries to sell.

The pot was invented 10,000 years ago, and a simmering one has been a symbol of a well-tended hearth every since. I don’t mean to suggest that now that you have been reminded of the age and goodness of a pot of water, you start boiling everything in your kitchen, but that instead of trying to figure out what to do about dinner, you put a big pot of water on the stove, light the burner under it, and then, as soon as it’s on its way to getting hot, start looking for things to put in it. Once you do, you will have dropped yourself, in a single gesture, directly into the middle of cooking a meal, jostled by your faith and will a few steps closer to dinner…”

Comments
[ SMALL SPACE GARDENING ]
Vegetable gardens are pretty much impossible here in Shady Acres (aka: our yard). I tried to do some container gardening on our deck the first summer we lived here and I managed to grow one sad tomato which was promptly eaten by a squirrel just as it ripened.
I had accepted my defeat, and instead purchased summer vegetables at the farmer’s market. Then, last week a kind neighbor graciously offered to share a section of her yard that she is clearing for garden space. It is currently covered with a thick layer of river rock, so, for the next month, the kids and I will be hauling loads of rocks, one wheelbarrow at a time, out of the soon-to-be garden.  
We won’t be taking a very big patch, maybe only around 6’ x 5’. I am a gardening novice, and I’m all ears for any advice for small space gardening! My kids have suggested cabbage and roses, neither of which will be happening. What are easy vegetables to grow that won’t take much room? So far I’m thinking some swiss chard and lettuce, carrots, and a tomato plant or two. 

[ SMALL SPACE GARDENING ]

Vegetable gardens are pretty much impossible here in Shady Acres (aka: our yard). I tried to do some container gardening on our deck the first summer we lived here and I managed to grow one sad tomato which was promptly eaten by a squirrel just as it ripened.

I had accepted my defeat, and instead purchased summer vegetables at the farmer’s market. Then, last week a kind neighbor graciously offered to share a section of her yard that she is clearing for garden space. It is currently covered with a thick layer of river rock, so, for the next month, the kids and I will be hauling loads of rocks, one wheelbarrow at a time, out of the soon-to-be garden.  

We won’t be taking a very big patch, maybe only around 6’ x 5’. I am a gardening novice, and I’m all ears for any advice for small space gardening! My kids have suggested cabbage and roses, neither of which will be happening. What are easy vegetables to grow that won’t take much room? So far I’m thinking some swiss chard and lettuce, carrots, and a tomato plant or two. 

Comments
[ EDISON ]
If you’ve never heard of Edison, Washington, you shouldn’t be surprised. This small town in the Skagit Valley has a mere 133 residents, according to the 2010 census. But even with such a small population, Edison has a lot to offer.

We drove up for the afternoon to celebrate our anniversary, after hearing so many good things about the cafes that line the one main road through town. Our first stop was Farm to Market Bakery for lunch, and we were not disappointed. I won’t ramble on about the food—there are plenty of online reviews—but it was worth the drive. 
We had heard a lot about the gourmet fare in Edison, but we were surprised that no one had mentioned the three or four galleries and artist studios in town, too. There was a really great printmaking exhibit at Smith & Vallee and while walking through, I turned a corner and stood face-to-face with this:

For those of you who haven’t met my husband in person, let me just say, the stranger in the print must be Patrick’s doppelgänger. I wonder if the other patrons in the gallery at the same time as us noticed it. 
The day before we visited Edison there was a community-wide garage sale (I’m still a little bummed about missing it), so there were a few leftover sales happening while we were there.  One of the best discoveries was a tent sale outside of Smith & Vallee that was filled with surplus wood slabs. I was desperately trying to think of a project that would justify a big chunk of black walnut, but I’m sure it would have sat in some sad corner of the house waiting indefinitely for me to do something with it. 

At the same sale, Patrick found a nice mat-cutter—something he’s been wanting for years —for $10. Now we have absolutely no excuse for the lack of art on our walls. 


We browsed the other shops in town which were filled with handmade art and crafts—not at all the kind you’d expect in a small farm town, but more along the lines of what you’d find in Ballard. Then, on our way to Tweets for pastries and coffee, we spotted a “free” pile, stacked in front of a little shop. We scooped up a few spools of nice yarn and a small wool cabbie hat for Alden. It was a pleasant surprise to be able to bring home a few goodies from an already delightful experience.

[ EDISON ]

If you’ve never heard of Edison, Washington, you shouldn’t be surprised. This small town in the Skagit Valley has a mere 133 residents, according to the 2010 census. But even with such a small population, Edison has a lot to offer.

We drove up for the afternoon to celebrate our anniversary, after hearing so many good things about the cafes that line the one main road through town. Our first stop was Farm to Market Bakery for lunch, and we were not disappointed. I won’t ramble on about the food—there are plenty of online reviews—but it was worth the drive. 

We had heard a lot about the gourmet fare in Edison, but we were surprised that no one had mentioned the three or four galleries and artist studios in town, too. There was a really great printmaking exhibit at Smith & Vallee and while walking through, I turned a corner and stood face-to-face with this:

For those of you who haven’t met my husband in person, let me just say, the stranger in the print must be Patrick’s doppelgänger. I wonder if the other patrons in the gallery at the same time as us noticed it. 

The day before we visited Edison there was a community-wide garage sale (I’m still a little bummed about missing it), so there were a few leftover sales happening while we were there.  One of the best discoveries was a tent sale outside of Smith & Vallee that was filled with surplus wood slabs. I was desperately trying to think of a project that would justify a big chunk of black walnut, but I’m sure it would have sat in some sad corner of the house waiting indefinitely for me to do something with it. 

At the same sale, Patrick found a nice mat-cutter—something he’s been wanting for years —for $10. Now we have absolutely no excuse for the lack of art on our walls. 

We browsed the other shops in town which were filled with handmade art and crafts—not at all the kind you’d expect in a small farm town, but more along the lines of what you’d find in Ballard. Then, on our way to Tweets for pastries and coffee, we spotted a “free” pile, stacked in front of a little shop. We scooped up a few spools of nice yarn and a small wool cabbie hat for Alden. It was a pleasant surprise to be able to bring home a few goodies from an already delightful experience.

Comments