modern thrifter

modern thrifter

Thrifter & designer. Blogging about life in our MCM home & living on a budget. I also design things with my husband. You can see our work at The Mahoney Studio

WEEKEND IN PICTURES
Last of the tomatoes from the garden.
First big storm of fall. And sadly, a leaky chimney.

New Mighty O Donuts shirts for the kids (a gift from their grandparents), and a hand-me-down wool sweater for Patrick from his great-uncle. 


Date night at an out-of-the-way, unpretentious spot. We brought board games and drank coffee, and were surprised to discover there was a live jazz band all night with a lot of dancing happening by the seniors in the room. It was fantastic.

WEEKEND IN PICTURES

Last of the tomatoes from the garden.

First big storm of fall. And sadly, a leaky chimney.

New Mighty O Donuts shirts for the kids (a gift from their grandparents), and a hand-me-down wool sweater for Patrick from his great-uncle. 

Date night at an out-of-the-way, unpretentious spot. We brought board games and drank coffee, and were surprised to discover there was a live jazz band all night with a lot of dancing happening by the seniors in the room. It was fantastic.

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[ EDISON ]
If you’ve never heard of Edison, Washington, you shouldn’t be surprised. This small town in the Skagit Valley has a mere 133 residents, according to the 2010 census. But even with such a small population, Edison has a lot to offer.

We drove up for the afternoon to celebrate our anniversary, after hearing so many good things about the cafes that line the one main road through town. Our first stop was Farm to Market Bakery for lunch, and we were not disappointed. I won’t ramble on about the food—there are plenty of online reviews—but it was worth the drive. 
We had heard a lot about the gourmet fare in Edison, but we were surprised that no one had mentioned the three or four galleries and artist studios in town, too. There was a really great printmaking exhibit at Smith & Vallee and while walking through, I turned a corner and stood face-to-face with this:

For those of you who haven’t met my husband in person, let me just say, the stranger in the print must be Patrick’s doppelgänger. I wonder if the other patrons in the gallery at the same time as us noticed it. 
The day before we visited Edison there was a community-wide garage sale (I’m still a little bummed about missing it), so there were a few leftover sales happening while we were there.  One of the best discoveries was a tent sale outside of Smith & Vallee that was filled with surplus wood slabs. I was desperately trying to think of a project that would justify a big chunk of black walnut, but I’m sure it would have sat in some sad corner of the house waiting indefinitely for me to do something with it. 

At the same sale, Patrick found a nice mat-cutter—something he’s been wanting for years —for $10. Now we have absolutely no excuse for the lack of art on our walls. 


We browsed the other shops in town which were filled with handmade art and crafts—not at all the kind you’d expect in a small farm town, but more along the lines of what you’d find in Ballard. Then, on our way to Tweets for pastries and coffee, we spotted a “free” pile, stacked in front of a little shop. We scooped up a few spools of nice yarn and a small wool cabbie hat for Alden. It was a pleasant surprise to be able to bring home a few goodies from an already delightful experience.

[ EDISON ]

If you’ve never heard of Edison, Washington, you shouldn’t be surprised. This small town in the Skagit Valley has a mere 133 residents, according to the 2010 census. But even with such a small population, Edison has a lot to offer.

We drove up for the afternoon to celebrate our anniversary, after hearing so many good things about the cafes that line the one main road through town. Our first stop was Farm to Market Bakery for lunch, and we were not disappointed. I won’t ramble on about the food—there are plenty of online reviews—but it was worth the drive. 

We had heard a lot about the gourmet fare in Edison, but we were surprised that no one had mentioned the three or four galleries and artist studios in town, too. There was a really great printmaking exhibit at Smith & Vallee and while walking through, I turned a corner and stood face-to-face with this:

For those of you who haven’t met my husband in person, let me just say, the stranger in the print must be Patrick’s doppelgänger. I wonder if the other patrons in the gallery at the same time as us noticed it. 

The day before we visited Edison there was a community-wide garage sale (I’m still a little bummed about missing it), so there were a few leftover sales happening while we were there.  One of the best discoveries was a tent sale outside of Smith & Vallee that was filled with surplus wood slabs. I was desperately trying to think of a project that would justify a big chunk of black walnut, but I’m sure it would have sat in some sad corner of the house waiting indefinitely for me to do something with it. 

At the same sale, Patrick found a nice mat-cutter—something he’s been wanting for years —for $10. Now we have absolutely no excuse for the lack of art on our walls. 

We browsed the other shops in town which were filled with handmade art and crafts—not at all the kind you’d expect in a small farm town, but more along the lines of what you’d find in Ballard. Then, on our way to Tweets for pastries and coffee, we spotted a “free” pile, stacked in front of a little shop. We scooped up a few spools of nice yarn and a small wool cabbie hat for Alden. It was a pleasant surprise to be able to bring home a few goodies from an already delightful experience.

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[ DATE ]

It’s rare for Patrick and I to get to spend time together during the day without the kids, so when he said he would be taking a half-day off this week, I quickly suggested a morning when both kids would be in school. 

So, what did we do on our mid-week morning date? We spent the morning sipping coffee (purchased with a Chinook Book coupon) and browsing aisles of used sinks and toilets, reclaimed windows, and old light fixtures at the ReStore, of course. This is the type of place that is hard to get through with two kids in tow, and perusing the shelves without being distracted by the kids was a fun treat.



We went in with a long list of things that we’d hoped to find, but it’s not like shopping at Home Depot, and sometimes not a single wish list item can be found. We did find two boxes of really great click-together Marmoleum in a rusty red color that would have been nice in our office-turned-art-room, but there was only enough to cover 1/5 of the space, and purchasing additional boxes at full price would have set us back about $600. Sad.



In the end, we walked out with new drip pans for the stove (the current ones were here when we bought the house and have rusted beyond cleaning), some drawer pulls for a mid century kid’s sized desk that I scored for free from the curb, and some heat vent covers that we have now discovered are the wrong size and will have to be returned. 

I’m sure this date sounds horribly mundane to most people, but I’m incredibly blessed to be married to someone who gets just as excited about used building materials as I do. And, tomorrow night we’ll be going out for a little more traditional dinner date.

[ DATE ]

It’s rare for Patrick and I to get to spend time together during the day without the kids, so when he said he would be taking a half-day off this week, I quickly suggested a morning when both kids would be in school. 

So, what did we do on our mid-week morning date? We spent the morning sipping coffee (purchased with a Chinook Book coupon) and browsing aisles of used sinks and toilets, reclaimed windows, and old light fixtures at the ReStore, of course. This is the type of place that is hard to get through with two kids in tow, and perusing the shelves without being distracted by the kids was a fun treat.

We went in with a long list of things that we’d hoped to find, but it’s not like shopping at Home Depot, and sometimes not a single wish list item can be found. We did find two boxes of really great click-together Marmoleum in a rusty red color that would have been nice in our office-turned-art-room, but there was only enough to cover 1/5 of the space, and purchasing additional boxes at full price would have set us back about $600. Sad.

In the end, we walked out with new drip pans for the stove (the current ones were here when we bought the house and have rusted beyond cleaning), some drawer pulls for a mid century kid’s sized desk that I scored for free from the curb, and some heat vent covers that we have now discovered are the wrong size and will have to be returned. 

I’m sure this date sounds horribly mundane to most people, but I’m incredibly blessed to be married to someone who gets just as excited about used building materials as I do. And, tomorrow night we’ll be going out for a little more traditional dinner date.

Comments
[ DATE NIGHT ON A DIME ]
I’m convinced that dates don’t have to cost a fortune. I’m also convinced that dating shouldn’t stop when you get married. Living on a limited budget, having kids, and being busy can definitely make dating more challenging, though. It’s easy to slip into the “we’ll just watch a movie at home and call it a date” routine, but that gets old pretty quickly. Over the years we’ve gotten better at figuring out how to go out without going broke.
Here are some of our favorite “going out” dates:  
Museums - We like the Frye Art Museum (it’s always free, but they accept donations), or the Seattle Art Museum is free the first Thursday of each month. The SAM’s Olympic Sculpture Park is fantastic, and again, it’s always free. 
Second Run Theaters - We are fortunate to live near the Crest Cinema ($3 tickets for all shows), my guess is that nearly all cities have a movie theater like this. 
Live Theater - For those of you who are under 25, many of the theaters in the area offer $10 tickets for most performances as a way to encourage young people to engage in the arts. 
Star Parties - The Seattle Astronomical Society has monthly stargazing parties at Greenlake and Cromwell Parks. Telescopes are set up at dusk and viewing is free. 
Dance Lessons - I just received a Groupon this morning for one month of swing dance lessons for $24, something we’ve wanted to do for a long time. 
Canoe/Kayaking - Once the weather gets a little nicer, check out rentals on canoes. We like going to the UW Waterfront Activities Center and canoeing through the arboretum. Canoes are rented by the hour, and the last time I checked I think the rate was $5–$10/hour depending on the day of the week and if you are a student or not.


Let’s face it though, sometimes it’s just too expensive or difficult to find a babysitter every week. Here are some of our favorite “staying in” dates (besides a movie and popcorn):  
Cook Dinner Together - This idea comes from Ashley over at Not Without Salt, and I think it’s brilliant. 
Board Games - Some people just aren’t game people, but we love them! A few of our favorites over the years have been Settler’s of Catan (the 2-player card version), Ticket to Ride, Dutch Blitz, and Cribbage. 
Wine & Cheese - We like to get a few different cheeses and accompaniments like pears, apples, crackers, etc. and just sit and talk over a glass of wine


Lastly, I want to point out that I don’t think that all dates should be cheap. We spend less on the majority of our dates so that every now and then we can really indulge in a bigger date—an expensive restaurant, drinks at my favorite little French Cocktail bar, or an overnight trip somewhere.
Do you have an idea for an inexpensive date that I haven’t mentioned? Please share!
Photo by Acacia Bergin

[ DATE NIGHT ON A DIME ]

I’m convinced that dates don’t have to cost a fortune. I’m also convinced that dating shouldn’t stop when you get married. Living on a limited budget, having kids, and being busy can definitely make dating more challenging, though. It’s easy to slip into the “we’ll just watch a movie at home and call it a date” routine, but that gets old pretty quickly. Over the years we’ve gotten better at figuring out how to go out without going broke.

Here are some of our favorite “going out” dates:

Museums - We like the Frye Art Museum (it’s always free, but they accept donations), or the Seattle Art Museum is free the first Thursday of each month. The SAM’s Olympic Sculpture Park is fantastic, and again, it’s always free.

Second Run Theaters - We are fortunate to live near the Crest Cinema ($3 tickets for all shows), my guess is that nearly all cities have a movie theater like this.

Live Theater - For those of you who are under 25, many of the theaters in the area offer $10 tickets for most performances as a way to encourage young people to engage in the arts.

Star Parties - The Seattle Astronomical Society has monthly stargazing parties at Greenlake and Cromwell Parks. Telescopes are set up at dusk and viewing is free.

Dance Lessons - I just received a Groupon this morning for one month of swing dance lessons for $24, something we’ve wanted to do for a long time.

Canoe/Kayaking - Once the weather gets a little nicer, check out rentals on canoes. We like going to the UW Waterfront Activities Center and canoeing through the arboretum. Canoes are rented by the hour, and the last time I checked I think the rate was $5–$10/hour depending on the day of the week and if you are a student or not.

    Let’s face it though, sometimes it’s just too expensive or difficult to find a babysitter every week. Here are some of our favorite “staying in” dates (besides a movie and popcorn):

    Cook Dinner Together - This idea comes from Ashley over at Not Without Salt, and I think it’s brilliant.

    Board Games - Some people just aren’t game people, but we love them! A few of our favorites over the years have been Settler’s of Catan (the 2-player card version), Ticket to Ride, Dutch Blitz, and Cribbage.

    Wine & Cheese - We like to get a few different cheeses and accompaniments like pears, apples, crackers, etc. and just sit and talk over a glass of wine

      Lastly, I want to point out that I don’t think that all dates should be cheap. We spend less on the majority of our dates so that every now and then we can really indulge in a bigger date—an expensive restaurant, drinks at my favorite little French Cocktail bar, or an overnight trip somewhere.

      Do you have an idea for an inexpensive date that I haven’t mentioned? Please share!

      Photo by Acacia Bergin

      Comments