[ EDISON ]
If you’ve never heard of Edison, Washington, you shouldn’t be surprised. This small town in the Skagit Valley has a mere 133 residents, according to the 2010 census. But even with such a small population, Edison has a lot to offer.

We drove up for the afternoon to celebrate our anniversary, after hearing so many good things about the cafes that line the one main road through town. Our first stop was Farm to Market Bakery for lunch, and we were not disappointed. I won’t ramble on about the food—there are plenty of online reviews—but it was worth the drive. 
We had heard a lot about the gourmet fare in Edison, but we were surprised that no one had mentioned the three or four galleries and artist studios in town, too. There was a really great printmaking exhibit at Smith & Vallee and while walking through, I turned a corner and stood face-to-face with this:

For those of you who haven’t met my husband in person, let me just say, the stranger in the print must be Patrick’s doppelgänger. I wonder if the other patrons in the gallery at the same time as us noticed it. 
The day before we visited Edison there was a community-wide garage sale (I’m still a little bummed about missing it), so there were a few leftover sales happening while we were there.  One of the best discoveries was a tent sale outside of Smith & Vallee that was filled with surplus wood slabs. I was desperately trying to think of a project that would justify a big chunk of black walnut, but I’m sure it would have sat in some sad corner of the house waiting indefinitely for me to do something with it. 

At the same sale, Patrick found a nice mat-cutter—something he’s been wanting for years —for $10. Now we have absolutely no excuse for the lack of art on our walls. 


We browsed the other shops in town which were filled with handmade art and crafts—not at all the kind you’d expect in a small farm town, but more along the lines of what you’d find in Ballard. Then, on our way to Tweets for pastries and coffee, we spotted a “free” pile, stacked in front of a little shop. We scooped up a few spools of nice yarn and a small wool cabbie hat for Alden. It was a pleasant surprise to be able to bring home a few goodies from an already delightful experience.

[ EDISON ]

If you’ve never heard of Edison, Washington, you shouldn’t be surprised. This small town in the Skagit Valley has a mere 133 residents, according to the 2010 census. But even with such a small population, Edison has a lot to offer.

We drove up for the afternoon to celebrate our anniversary, after hearing so many good things about the cafes that line the one main road through town. Our first stop was Farm to Market Bakery for lunch, and we were not disappointed. I won’t ramble on about the food—there are plenty of online reviews—but it was worth the drive. 

We had heard a lot about the gourmet fare in Edison, but we were surprised that no one had mentioned the three or four galleries and artist studios in town, too. There was a really great printmaking exhibit at Smith & Vallee and while walking through, I turned a corner and stood face-to-face with this:

For those of you who haven’t met my husband in person, let me just say, the stranger in the print must be Patrick’s doppelgänger. I wonder if the other patrons in the gallery at the same time as us noticed it. 

The day before we visited Edison there was a community-wide garage sale (I’m still a little bummed about missing it), so there were a few leftover sales happening while we were there.  One of the best discoveries was a tent sale outside of Smith & Vallee that was filled with surplus wood slabs. I was desperately trying to think of a project that would justify a big chunk of black walnut, but I’m sure it would have sat in some sad corner of the house waiting indefinitely for me to do something with it. 

At the same sale, Patrick found a nice mat-cutter—something he’s been wanting for years —for $10. Now we have absolutely no excuse for the lack of art on our walls. 

We browsed the other shops in town which were filled with handmade art and crafts—not at all the kind you’d expect in a small farm town, but more along the lines of what you’d find in Ballard. Then, on our way to Tweets for pastries and coffee, we spotted a “free” pile, stacked in front of a little shop. We scooped up a few spools of nice yarn and a small wool cabbie hat for Alden. It was a pleasant surprise to be able to bring home a few goodies from an already delightful experience.

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  1. modernthrifter posted this